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Classic French croissant recipe

It’s all about the layers…

Klik hier voor Nederlandse versie
With this recipe we want to give you the exact directions on how we go about making classic French croissants. The recipe is an adaptation from the recipe for Classic Croissants by Jeffrey Hamelman. We started out largely following the instructions for his recipe, changed everything to our beloved metric system and found out some worthwhile croissant knowledge of our own along the way. Hopefully enough to justify sharing it all with you and inspiring you to give croissant baking a shot yourself.

Before you start we can recommend watching our croissant making video to get a general feel for the recipe.
You can also check out our croissant making log where we keep track of our own croissant baking adventures.

This recipe will yield about 15 good croissants plus some leftover bits which you can use to make a few, slightly odd shaped ones, or other inventive croissant-like creations.

If at first you don’t succeed, maybe you can take comfort from the fact that our first efforts were not very ‘croissant worthy’. But as you can see we persevered and got better…But we have to admit it is and always will be a tricky process. You have to work precise and be focused to get good results. So away with screaming children, hyperactive animals and all other things distracting! Put on some appropriate croissant making music and lets get to it…

According to Raymond Calvel croissants laminated with margarine are formed into the crescent shape, while croissants laminated with butter are left in the straight form. We say, use whichever shape you like best, but do use butter!

The Croissant Recipe

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Ingredients for the Croissant Dough

500 g French Type 55 flour or unbleached all-purpose flour / plain flour (extra for dusting)

140 g water

140 g whole milk (you can take it straight from the fridge)

55 g sugar

40 g soft unsalted butter

11 g instant yeast

12 g salt

Other Ingredients

280 g cold unsalted butter for laminating

1 egg + 1 tsp water for the egg wash

First time croissant baker? Choose a cold day with a room temperature below 20 ºC / 68 ºF . This way you will have more time for the whole process and less chance of your precious butter being absorbed by the dough. The key is to keep the butter solid between the layers of dough, this is what gives the croissant its flaky layers.

Day 1

Making the Croissant Dough
Combine the dough ingredients and knead for 3 minutes until the dough comes together and you’ve reached the stage of low to moderate gluten development. You do not want too much gluten development because you will struggle with the dough fighting back during laminating. Shape the dough like a disc, not a ball, before you refrigerate it, so it will be easier to roll it into a square shape the following day. Place the disc on a plate, cover with clingfilm and leave in the fridge overnight.

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Day 2

Laminating the Dough
Cut the cold butter (directly from the fridge) lengthwise into 1,25 cm thick slabs. Arrange the pieces of butter on waxed paper to form a square of about 15 cm x 15 cm. Cover the butter with another layer of waxed paper and with a rolling pin pound butter until it’s about 19 cm x 19 cm. Trim / straighten the edges of the butter and put the trimmings on top of the square. Now pound lightly until you have a final square of 17 cm x 17 cm. Wrap in paper and refrigerate the butter slab until needed.

Use just enough flour on your work surface to prevent the dough from sticking. However keep the amount to a minimum, otherwise too much flour will be incorporated between the layers and this will show in the end result.


Take the dough out of the fridge. With a rolling pin roll out the dough disc into a 26 cm x 26 cm square. Try to get the square as perfect as possible and with an even thickness. Get the slab of butter from the fridge. Place the dough square so one of the sides of the square is facing you and place the butter slab on it with a 45 degree angle to the dough so a point of the butter square is facing you. Fold a flap of dough over the butter, so the point of the dough reaches the center of the butter. Do the same with the three other flaps. The edges of the dough flaps should slightly overlap to fully enclose the butter. With the palm of your hand lightly press the edges to seal the seams.

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Now the dough with the sealed in butter needs to be rolled out. With a lightly floured rolling pin start rolling out, on a lightly flour dusted surface, the dough to a rectangle of 20 x 60 cm. Start rolling from the center of the dough towards the edges, and not from one side of the dough all the way to the other side. This technique helps you to keep the dough at an even thickness. You can also rotate your dough 180 degrees to keep it more even, because you tend to use more pressure when rolling away from you than towards yourself. You can use these techniques during all the rolling steps of this recipe. Aim at lengthening the dough instead of making it wider and try to keep all edges as straight as possible.

Fold the dough letter style, cover with clingfilm and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Repeat the rolling and folding two more times (ending up with 27 layers in total), each time rolling until the dough is about 20 cm x 60 cm. After each fold you should turn the dough 90 degrees before rolling again. The open ‘end’ of the dough should be towards you every time when rolling out the dough. After the second turn, again give it a 30 minute rest in the fridge. After the third turn you leave the dough in the fridge overnight until day 3, the actual croissant making day!

  • Roll out to 20 cm x 60 cm
  • Refrigerate 30 minutes
  • Rotate 90 degrees
  • Roll out to 20 cm x 60 cm
  • Refrigerate 30 minutes
  • Rotate 90 degrees
  • Roll out to 20 cm x 60 cm
  • Refrigerate until day 3
  • Rotate 90 degrees
  • Roll out to 20 cm x 110 cm

Each laminating step should not take more than a few minutes. However if, due to initial inexperience for example, it should take you longer, you can fold your dough letter style, cover it and refrigerate it for 20 minutes and continue the rolling process after this rest. It is very important the butter stays solid.

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Day 3

Dividing the Dough
Take the dough from the fridge. Lightly flour your work surface. Now very gently roll the dough into a long and narrow strip of 20 cm x 110 cm. If the dough starts to resist too much or shrink back during this process you can fold it in thirds and give it a rest in the fridge for 10 to 20 minutes before continuing. Do not fight the dough, when the dough refuses to get any longer, rest it in the fridge! It is such a shame to ruin two days of work.

When your dough has reached its intended shape, carefully lift it a few centimeters to allow it to naturally shrink back from both sides. This way it will not shrink when you cut it. Your strip of dough should be long enough to allow you to trim the ends to make them straight and still be left with a length of about 100 cm.

Shaping the Croissants
For the next stage you will need a tape measure and a pizza wheel. Lay a tape measure along the top of the dough. With the wheel you mark the top of the dough at 12,5 cm intervals along the length (7 marks total). Now lay the tape measure along the bottom of the dough and make a mark at 6,25 cm. Then continue to make marks at 12,5 cm intervals from this point (8 marks total). So the bottom and the top marks do not align with each other and form the basis for your triangles.

Now make diagonal cuts starting from the top corner cutting down to the first bottom mark. Make diagonal cuts along the entire length of the dough. Then change the angle and make cuts from the other top corner to the bottom mark to create triangles. Again repeat this along the length of the dough. This way you will end up with 15 triangles and a few end pieces of dough.

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Using your pizza wheel, make 1.5 cm long notches in the center of the short side of each dough triangle.

Now very gently elongate each triangle to about 25 cm. This is often done by hand, but we have found that elongating with a rolling pin, very carefully, almost without putting pressure on the dough triangle, works better for us. You can try both methods and see what you think gives the best result.

After you cut a notch in the middle of the short end of the triangle, try and roll the two wings by moving your hands outwards from the center, creating the desired shape with a thinner, longer point. Also try and roll the dough very tightly at the beginning and put enough pressure on the dough to make the layers stick together (but not so much as to damage the layers of course).

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Proofing and Baking
Arrange the shaped croissants on baking sheets, making sure to keep enough space between them so they will not touch when proofing and baking. Combine the egg with a teaspoon of water and whisk until smooth. Give the croissants their first thin coating of egg wash.

Proof the croissants draft-free at an ideal temperature of 24ºC to 26.5ºC (above that temperature there is a big chance butter will leak out!). We use our small Rofco B20 stone oven as a croissant proofing cabinet by preheating it for a minute to 25ºC / 77ºF. It retains this temperature for a long time because of the oven stones and isolation. The proofing should take about 2 hours. You should be able to tell if they are ready by carefully shaking the baking sheet and see if the croissants slightly wiggle. You should also be able to see the layers of dough when looking at your croissants from the side.

Preheat the oven at 200 ºC / 390 ºF convection or 220 ºC / 430 ºF conventional oven.
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Right before baking, give the croissants their second thin coat of egg wash. We bake the croissants in our big convection oven for 6 minutes at 195ºC, then lowering the temperature to 165ºC, and bake them for another 9 minutes. Hamelman suggest baking the croissants for 18 to 20 minutes at 200ºC, turning your oven down a notch if you think the browning goes too quickly. But you really have to learn from experience and by baking several batches what the ideal time and temperature is for your own oven. Take out of the oven, leave for a few minutes on the baking sheet, then transfer to a cooling rack.

Best eaten while warm and fresh of course. Croissant we don’t eat or share within a day we freeze. We put them in the preheated oven (180 ºC / 355 ºF) for 8 minutes straight from the freezer. Nothing wrong with that, croissants eaten nice and warm, almost as good as the fresh ones…almost!

We used the excess dough we trimmed from the edges to make, a bit odd shaped but still very delicious, ‘pain au chocolat’, using our favorite Valrhona Caraïbe dark chocolate. The trimmed dough parts are still worth using, it would be a shame to throw them away!
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320 Responses to Classic French croissant recipe

  1. bao-kim says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,

    Wow, how lucky I am to have found your Blog with such detailed tips and instructions fr making French Croissant. Like you both, my husband and I love the French Croissant from France and have always wanted to make them since we cant find anything comparable here in America.

    I have been researching on the web, baking books and just took a class on making croissant last week. The class is in America and the croissant did not taste anything like what we had in Paris, therefore I am determined to try to make them to see if can achieve this myself. I looked at lots of French recipes, and they tend to use Fresh Yeast instead of instant yeast, could you tell me if there is any difference of using one or the other? Have you used fresh yeast, if yes, how would you substitute it into your recipe??? Per your advice, I will have to wait a couple of days till the weather cools down a bit before rolling my sleeves up and try to make Croissant:). You really inspired me, thank you sooooo much. Will wait to hear from you then I will embark on my project.

    Have a wonderful day,

    bao-kim

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Bao-Kim,
      Thank you very, very much for your kind words and sharing your enthusiasm for the real deal croissants. It will not be a problem of course, substituting the instant yeast with fresh yeast. If you go from instant to fresh you need to triple the amount, so you would need to use about 33 g for this recipe. Our experience is that it will not make a huge difference in the final result.
      And yes, you are very wise to wait until the weather cools down. Making this recipe for the first time, the stages might take a bit longer because you are not that familiar with the process and when working in warm surroundings you really need to work fast. Low temps give you just that extra bit of time without having to worry about butter leaking out of the dough.
      Hope you will get the croissants results you want really soon. Let us know how you get on.

      Happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

      • bao-kim says:

        Dear Ed and Marieke,

        Thank you SO much for replying:). My husband and I will be making croissant this weekend, thanks to your wonderful instructional video and your encouraging words. We do have one more question to make sure we understand all your tips for success. Do we trim the top and bottom edges each time we do our folds, meaning we trim them 3 times total, or do we only trim the top and bottom edges at the very last fold before we cut and shape them into croissant?

        We eagerly wait for your reply, have a great day,

        bao-kim

        • bao-kim says:

          Dear Ed and Marieke,

          Wow, you are our heros, thank you for such a quick reply! It is now 6:50AM on a Saturday morning in California (and the weather is cool), we will start making our croissant and will let you know the result:)

          Have a wonderful day,

          bao-kim

    • sara says:

      mi sono appena cimentata a farli…speriamo bene…grazieeeeeeeeeee mi avete ispirata

  2. Yang says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,
    I tried to do your croissants as soon as I got back from England but didnt realize it was a lot warmer in my hometown and it was a total disaster. Luckily, I havent lost heart. I’ll just try when the season is right again. Your pics are just so attempting and I cant stopping staring at them. My husband loves croissants so I will try my best. Watching your video now and just wanna come over to say thank you and well done!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Yang,
      You are so right in your attitude to just give it another go. All this happened with is too and we also started out with too warm conditions, butter leaking out…the works! But on a nice cool day, just give it another try and make sure there are no distractions and work precise. I think there are very few people who make perfect croissants the first time they try….

      Keep us posted!

      Marieke

  3. Very nice tutorial! And your croissants look beautiful. Yes, I convert every recipe to “our beloved metric system”, too. (Aren’t we in the 21st century? Or at the age of stage coaches and horseback mail couriers?) I once had croissants that were obviously made with margarine or shortening – gross!
    Happy Baking,
    Karin

  4. bao-kim says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,

    This is bao-kim again, we DID it, we made croissants following your instructions this weekend. We made the dough on Thursday, did the lamination on Friday and we woke up early Saturday morning to shape, proof the croissants for 2 hours and then we were rewarded with the yummiest croissants by 9AM with our coffee, yippee:). We wanted to report to you that we did get the honeycomb texture in our croissants, and the taste was buttery delicious! Thank you for your inspirations.

    We do have a question for you both and hope that you can enlighten us so we can improve on our next batch. We cut our croissants with the base measuring 7.25cm with the height at 15.5 cm, and the thickness was 3 mm. As we let them proofed for 2 hours, they did puff up quite a bit, though not quite double. We were hoping that when we bake them they will increase in size a little more like yours did in your video. Ours were only slightly bigger than the proofed size, but not much more. My husband thinks that was due to my rolling the dough too thin??? Also the croissant seemed to only rise up vertically and not much horizontally, which made our croissants not as Fat as what I was hoping for. Please suggest what we should do differently to improve on our next batch, which is VERY soon:). We eagerly wait for your wisdom.

    Again, thank you so much for all your help. Have a wonderful weekend!

    bao-kim

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Bao-Kim,
      Well it all sounds like you are on the right track. It is very hard to pinpoint what could be ‘the problem’ with the puffing up of the croissants, both when proofing and baking. The first suggestion for next time would be to stick exactly to the measurements given in the recipe. The next thing to maybe take a look at is the flour you use. You could try, if possible, a few different brands /types because there can be a difference in result (using regular bread flour for instance could mean your croissants stay flatter and ‘heavier’). The baking result also has a lot to do with your oven. We use a (professional) convection oven and it gives the croissants a real boost, this would be less so in our normal household oven, and the bake would also be less even. So you also have to play with settings, temperatures and times a bit to get to the best possible croissant for your particular ingredients and equipment and surroundings. The results will never be the same for anyone. Place ten people in a row and let them bake and all results will be different, even with the same ovens (see baking programs and you know what we mean).
      But while trying to get to that perfect croissant…it is a road paved with lovely tasty croissants very much worth making and eating and a lot of times better than anything you can buy!

      Happy croissant baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  5. Jenny says:

    Hi,your croissants look beautiful.I tried your recipe yesterday,they came out very nice without any butter leak.Thank you for the recipe.I want to ask when I shape the croissants do I have to make thin triangles for the honeycomb texture?Thank you.

  6. Luis from Argentina says:

    Hi! and thanx for the recipe. I do have a question though. The croissants came out beautiful except for one detail. Mine seem to be a little too dry and not soft, not so “bready” and they didn´t have the honeycomb texture you pictured. (they have the honey comb but the cells were much smaller). They did rise a twice the size so I reckon the yeast was ok. After you let them cool down for a few minutes you can´t press them with your fingers. They stay hard. Thanks for any help! Luis

    • Sandy says:

      Luis, I think that a great croissant IS crisp (hard) on the outside. If they are soft when you poke them, you did it wrong!

      • Weekend Bakers says:

        Hi Luis and Sandy,
        Yes, we also think a good croissant is crisp on the outside (but not hard as in rock hard of course). It must be crispy and flaky and when you take a bite it should be really easy to bite into it. It is also normal that they cannot be pressed with your finger after baking.
        It is always hard to judge without actually seeing the final product. Croissant making is really a question of practicing a lot! And then practicing some more and still there are times it does not work out so well. It is one of the hardest bakes to get consistently right we think. Still, even when it does not work out perfectly, it is hopefully very edible :)

        Happy Baking,

        Marieke

    • Ronald says:

      Hey Luis,
      don’t forget that the structure and taste of French croissants are completely different then the ‘medialunas’ that are common in Argentina.. No tienen nada que ver.

  7. Sandy says:

    Hi-
    I am curious – the recipe I have used for croissants has almost twice the amount of laminating butter (1 pound/454 grams) as yours, with the same amounts of flour, liquid, and yeast. Isn’t this a pretty big difference?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Sandy,
      We know there are recipes that use more butter but we cannot explain the almost twice amount you mention. It seems like a lot and we would not know how to work it into our dough and judging from our results we would maybe say it is not necessary…

      Marieke & Ed

      • Sandy says:

        Ooops, I failed to included the flour in the sponge when comparing the butter amounts!

        When I did my turns today, however, I noticed that the butter layer comopletely broke up; I could see it through the dough. Is this OK?

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          Hi Sandy,
          No, I am afraid that is not so good. The butter layer should be exactly that: one layer that has the right consistency, so not too warm not too cold, to stay one layer that can be rolled out. If you get these islands of butter the end result will not include the layers and honeycomb structure that you would be aiming for.

  8. Alvin says:

    Hi,

    Love your Blog!
    Just trying to make croissants at the moment can you tell me do you use special butter for laminated dough or is it your ordinary supermarket butter. Cheers, Alvin

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Alvin,
      We use butter that is organic and we make sure it is as fresh as possible (so always a freshly bought package, no oxidation). Our dairy butter has a fat content of 82%.

      Happy croissant baking!

  9. Jenny says:

    Hi,your croissants look beautiful.I tried your recipe yesterday,they came out very nice without any butter leak.Thank you for the recipe.I want to ask when I shape the croissants do I have to make thin triangles for the honeycomb texture?Thank you.
    Reply

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Jenny,
      It says in the recipe: Now very gently elongate each triangle to about 25 cm. This is often done by hand, but we have found that elongating with a rolling pin, very carefully, almost without putting pressure on the dough triangle, works better for us. You can try both methods and see what you think gives the best result. I hope this is clear for you.
      The honeycomb structure is only achieved when you work very precise when building up the layers when laminating.
      You have to carefully follow the recipe and give it some time and practice to get it right and get to know your dough.
      Good luck with it and Happy Croissant Baking!

      ED & Marieke

  10. romcharea says:

    i will try the new one again.Thank you………

  11. pearlj says:

    I just tried your croissant recipe this past weekend. My croissants turned out perfectly. Thank you for sharing.

  12. Billy says:

    Hi, I found this very useful and detailed website in youtube, your instructions in making croissants are so detailed!!
    Because I have tried making croissant a few times, but total failure, very bread-like, no honeycomb interior, and every time my butter leaking out while rolling, so frustrated.
    Because I adopted another recipe that doesn’t mention the required dimensions.
    May I ask what is the optimal thicknesses of the butter slab and the croissant dough needed for laminating?
    After enclosing the butter into the dough and rolling, what should be the optimal thickness of the dough before folding?
    I should have more questions, but can’t think about them right now. Thanks!!!

    Rgds,
    Billy

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Billy,
      Thanks for your message. If you follow the measurements carefully and do the same for the weight of the ingredients it logically follows that the slab and dough also have the right thickness.
      For the slab of butter (around 8 to 10 mm thick we guess) and for the dough it is important to work precise and stick to the measurements and roll it as even as possible.
      So in short the right dimensions lead to the optimum thickness. We never measure the thickness, only the length and width.

      Hope this helps you and you will bake many wonderful croissants in the very near future!

      Greetings from Holland,

      Ed & Marieke

  13. felipe says:

    i think is a great recipe, but just wondering you can not make croissants the same day?? i mean 3 days for a croissant dough?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Felipe,
      This is also done for the timing. If you did it all in one day you will be eating croissants at ten o’clock in the evening!

  14. yorick says:

    Thank you so much. I try to make some croissants but they came out flat and dense. Any tips? Advices?
    I don’t have a stand mixer. I kneaded by hand
    Regards and thank you again

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Yorick,
      Yes! The first thing you have got to look at is the temperature of your dough, especially during the final proofing on day three. This temperature has to be correct for the proofing times to correspond. If the dough is too cold proofing will take much longer and if the dough is under-proofed you will also not get the right texture. (see our tips on dough temperature: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/a-few-tips-on-dough-temperature/). And when kneading by hand it will take a bit more time compared to the 3 minutes with the mixer mentioned in the recipe.
      Make sure to carefully build up the layers and work precise. With croissants you cannot afford to skip any stage or work not precise because it will show in the end result immediately.
      Flat and dense can also mean your flour is the culprit. Maybe you can change something there too and try a different, lighter type or a combination with pastry flour.

      Good luck with it and remember that it is really a question of baking and trying a lot and gaining experience to get it right. It is one of the hardest bakes to get right.
      Happy Baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  15. Vera says:

    Hi,

    I was searching for instructions on how to make croissants when I found your video on YouTube. I then went to your blog, studied the recipe, read all comments, read your logs, went back to the video, and finally this past Monday, we had a cool, 65F day, followed by a cool, 68F day so I decided to go ahead and try it. I followed your instructions/recipe exactly and made delicious, buttery, flaky and honeycombed croissants!

    Thanks so much for sharing! For months I’ve been researching which recipe/method to try, and am glad I decided to try yours!

    Best,

    Vera

  16. Alice says:

    Hi,

    I made croissants once few weeks ago, and it turned out like a disaster :)). Then I found this post and decided to give another try. However, since I am a newbie and it is much harder to handle such a big amount of dough, I decided to divide your recipe in a half. And it was not really a good decision because all the measurements when forming the shape have to change. I used all of my math ability and now I just finished the third fold of dough lamination stage. Tomorrow will be the day, and I am so nervous :)) Hope it turns out great, and I will update the result with you. Thank you for posting such a detailed recipe!!

  17. Richard says:

    hi ,
    i am from India and here we get either dry yeast or normal yeast. please suggest me the measurement for same.
    as the flour quality is not good for bread so in this case we add gluten and bread improver in that.
    what proportion of these ingredients required ?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Richard,
      There are two types of dry yeast, the instant and the active dry yeast. I do not know which type you use. The most common is the instant dry type. Their conversion from fresh yeast is as follows.

      Converting from fresh yeast to active dry yeast you multiply the weight of the fresh yeast by 0.4
      Converting from fresh yeast to instant dry yeast you multiply the weight of the fresh yeast by 0.33

      If you want to use fresh yeast for this recipe multiply the amount given for the instant yeast by 3.

      About the gluten:
      Considering the differences in protein content among flours, you may need to experiment with the amount of gluten to flour until you achieve the texture and structure you like. I read that a rule of thumb is about 1 tbsp for every cup or 125g of flour if it is an ‘all purpose’ type of flour. Our bread flour has a gluten content of between 12 and 13%. We never add gluten or any bread improver o we do not have experience ourselves with these products. I would suggest trying to use only the added gluten first and see how that works out. Maybe you do not need the improver. Opinions about bread improver are very mixed.
      You can read some more about it here:http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1072/bread-improver
      I presume there would also be some information on the package about what exactly it contains and how much you need to add. Our suggestion would be that if you can work with only the added gluten it would probably be better. But of course I do not know your flour and how much ‘help’ it needs to get a good loaf.

      Good luck with the experimenting and baking!

      Marieke

      • Richard says:

        hi ,
        Thanks for reply.
        please suggest me how to make all purpose flour.
        i think that would be help me to make a good products.

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          hi Richard,
          All purpose flour is just the same as plain flour. It is not something you make but it is the more or less standard flour you can use for just about anything you bake or make with flour. You can see it as the ‘supermarket flour’ or flour that is most readily available. I do not know your flour and do not know what is available to you so I took this ‘all purpose or plain flour as a starting point in the hope that it somewhat resembles your flour.

          Marieke

  18. Jev says:

    Hello
    The amazing pictures above have convinced me to try out this recipe.
    The dough is resting in the fridge but I have just realized that I have bought salted butter instead of unsalted butter.May I still use it?
    Thank you for the help :)

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Jev,
      Yes you can use the salted butter but we would suggest to lower the salt content in the dough because of it. How much depends on how salty the butter is. Maybe you already baked them by now? Love to hear how they turned out!

      Happy Baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  19. Sam says:

    Hello I was experimenting and I went ahead and also tried your croissant recipe. Everything is great except my croissant wasn’t as light In weight and flaky enough. I had the layers but no flakiness. Please help!!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Sam,
      Please do not feel discouraged when your first attempt is not perfect. Croissant baking asks for many attempts and practice before you get a perfect result and even then it can still vary and go wrong when your attention slips a bit for example. It sounds like your attempt was already very successful and you need to build on that. The way you describe it we would suggest first of all looking at the flour you use, maybe you need to change something there (a lighter variety, if you used bread flour for example it could be that this causes the lack of lightness and flakiness). Next to that the most important thing is to work very precise and stick to the measurements when building up the layers. Like we said, with croissants you cannot afford to skip any stage or work not precise because it will show in the end result immediately. And be sure to give the croissants all the proofing time they need and at the right temperature for them to develop to the right stage for the layer build up.

      You have to get to know the dough and learn as you do it more often. There are no tricks, just practice and practice some more.

      Good luck and happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke
      If you haven’t already you can also take a look at our lessons learned in our croissant log and see what horrible croissants we made when we started: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/wkb-2012-croissant-making-log/

  20. Jev says:

    Hello

    The croissants were really good.I halved the amount of salt so they were not salty.The layers were fine but I did not get the honeycomb pattern. I will keep on trying and I will keep you updated :)
    Thank you for a really good recipe.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Keep up the good baking work Jev! great to hear it worked out well with the salted butter and halving the amount in the dough.
      Love to hear more as you progress :)

      Happy Baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  21. Tasha says:

    Hi hi. I’ve been shopping around for a good croissant recipe and I am currently trying yours. I’m having problems with the dough unfortunately :( It was really sticky after kneading and it keeps sticking to the counter so as you can imagine trying to do the turns is quite a mess. Should I add more flour next time I try to bake it?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Tasha,

      It is important to get the right dough consistency. The way you describe it your dough is definitely too sticky and this can be caused by the type of flour you use. Each flour type and brand has its own absorption and for you this probably means that you should use a little less liquid the next time to get the right consistency. Be sure to weigh everything carefully and right down what you do and how much you use. Making croissants is not easy and there is no way you can cut corners and still get a good result so work very precise and with care and attention. Take another look at our croissant video and you can see how much flour we use when working the dough. The trick is to use enough on the dough and the worktop to make it easy to handle but not so much that it will change the dough. So carefully brush with flour to get a very thin coating that is still good enough to help you to handle the dough. I am sure that the video can also help you with judging how it should look and how much flour to use.

      Good luck with it and remember that we all have had many attempts and tweaks to get to that perfect croissant. It is one of the most challenging bakes.

      Marieke

  22. Chris says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,
    I want to try your croissant recipe, but would prefer to make half as many ie about 7, at a go, as we try to eat them only at w/ends! Would it be best to make the full mix, then halve the dough at the start of Day 3, prior to rolling and cutting out, and freeze one half for use the following week?
    Also, you talk of using a ‘lighter’ flour to improve lightness, what exactly is this? In the UK we have Plain Flour, which is usually used for pastry, and Strong White Flour, which has a higher gluten content and is used for breadmaking. The Strong White is normally recommended in Croissant recipes, but the croissants do not come out particularly light. Would Plain Flour be better? We can also buy the Italian ‘oo double zero flour which I have not tried. Your comments would be much appreciated. Very many thanks. Best wishes, Chris

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Chris,
      We understand. You would rather make more in one go than do the whole process again for ‘just’ 7 croissants. Although we have not tried it ourselves, the freezing of the croissant dough, we have heard from other bakers it works well. Till now we just froze the baked croissants and this works well too. But if you freeze the dough we would like to know from you how well you think it works and if the result is up to par with the fresh batch process.
      As far as the flour goes we would recommend using the plain flour or maybe a combination of plain flour and Italian 00 flour. Strong bread flour is not the best option because of the (very probable) higher gluten content and amount of fibers still present in the flour, weighing it down as it were.

      Good luck and happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

      • Chris says:

        Hello Ed and Marieke
        Many thanks for your reply – your comments regarding the flour were very interesting. I have tried freezing cooked croissants before, but I felt that they dried out a bit from their time in the freezer. Like your correspondent Esther, I have been quite impressed with the Waitrose bake from frozen croissants, and thought perhaps it would work well with home made. I guess the frozen dough would need to be brought up to temperature slowly, perhaps overnight in the fridge. I shall give it a go and let you know how I get on! Many thanks. Chris

  23. Pingback: Yummy Croissants! | Tasty

  24. Esther says:

    I had a go at making these at the weekend. They were delicious! Thank you so much for the recipe. Here is my attempt: http://estherprivett.wordpress.com/2013/06/18/yummy-croissants-2/

  25. dd says:

    “Cut the cold butter (directly from the fridge) lengthwise into 1,25 cm thick slabs. Arrange the pieces of butter on waxed paper to form a square of about 15 cm x 15 cm. Cover the butter with another layer of waxed paper and with a rolling pin pound butter until it’s about 19 cm x 19 cm.”

    i understood up to this part. can someone help me with the rest please

    “Trim / straighten the edges and put the trimmings on top of the square. Now pound lightly until you have a final square of 17 cm x 17 cm. Fold in the paper and refrigerate the butter slab until needed.”

    what is this bit referring to? the dough or the butter. and put what trimmings on what square. very confused

    thanks in advance

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello dd,
      This all concerns the butter. You trim the edges of the butter slab (thus making it smaller) and place the trimmings of the butter on the butter slab and pound lightly to incorporate again and make sure the final square measures 17 x 17 cm. Wrap the butter in paper and refrigerate. It might also be helpful for you to watch the mentioned video of us making the croissants where you can also see the butter trimming process. http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/video-making-baking-classic-french-croissants/

      Good luck with it and happy baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  26. JP says:

    Amazing croissants. Would you have a recipe for “you beaut almond cream filling” for them?
    Keep up the good work. Love your baguette recipe as well.
    Cheers,
    Foxtyg

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi JP,
      Thanks! But we do not no exactly what you are referring to regarding the cream filling??

      Greetings and happy baking,

      Marieke

  27. Karon B. says:

    As a professional baker and croissant maker I found your recipe and information to be excellent. I recently gave a hands-on cooking class and taught from ‘scratch’ the whole process to five brilliant ‘students’ who were almost all ‘newbies’ to baking in general. They had great success and I will share your website with them as I love your videos and information. Also, photographs of the students, smiles on their faces with their own croissants on the baking racks.

  28. joseph torrres yap says:

    ived tried the recipe, but it comes out messy,, ived experienced butter leakage fom the dough. i tried to add flour, the result was no good.. I want to try again, can you tell me what causes the butter to leak? temperature and procedures are correct..

    thanks
    jojo yap

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Joseph,
      There are so many things you have to do right to get a good croissant and many things that can go wrong. That is why it is one of the most challenging bakes in the book of course and it is normal it will take you a few rounds of baking to get it right for your circumstances. Do not be discouraged because it is the same for all of us.
      Butter leakage can indicate a number of things: butter is too soft to begin with, you worked not fast enough and the butter got soft or a combination. Working with the dough in a cool room on a cool day so you have a bit more time for all your steps will surely help.

      Also the right amount of pressure when rolling out the dough is important. If you press too hard and for too long butter can get out. Having to press hard to roll out the dough can also be an indication of the dough itself being developed too far (too much gluten) and the dough is starting to get too elastic. Reducing the mixing time a bit could be helpful.
      Always hard to pinpoint without seeing the actual dough of course.

      Hope you will give it another try.

      Happy Baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  29. Careen Koh says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,
    I am glad and happy to found your blog today for croissants recipe. My son had been requesting me to made this delicious treat for him a few months ago. I like your recipe and details instruction but my family do not fancy butter. What can I substitute for the butter to make this croissant. I plan to try out this Saturday.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hallo Careen,
      To be honest we have never heard of nor seen a croissant that was not made with butter (or margarine which is considered the ‘cheaper version’). So we do not think there can really be a substitute that in any way can lead to something resembling the layering and flakiness of a buttery croissant.
      And we also do not know any child (till now) that does not like them.
      Sorry we cannot help you with an alternative but unless you are not allowed to eat butter, we would suggest trying this recipe with butter anyway, because to us the only real croissant is a buttery one.

      Happy Baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  30. Careen Koh says:

    Dear Ed & Marieke…
    Thanks for your reply. I will try making this delicious treat follow your recipe.
    Regards,
    Careen

  31. Bettina says:

    Hello and thank you for your awesome instructions and tips! I tried making croissants twice before with pretty good results for a first time croissant maker but the third time was a charm. With the practice and your recipe my third attempt got me kicked out of my moms house because the croissants were SOOOOOO good, shecouldn’t stop eating them :)

    Of all the recipes and videos I looked at to prepare for making these treats yours was the best and most helpful.

    Thanks so much,
    Bettina

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Bettina,

      Thank you so much for sharing this with us!
      Funny, how being kicked out of the house in this case can be considered a compliment :)

      Keep up the wonderful baking and sharing!

      Ed & Marieke

  32. JW says:

    I have been using active dry yeast rather than instant and was wondering if I needed to use the same amount and if I need to use warm water in order to activate it. Thanks!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello JW,

      You always need to use a little more active dry yeast than you would instant. For this you should multiply the amount of instant yeast by about 1.2. So for this recipe it would be 11 x 1.2 = 13.2 g active dry yeast. If you use instant yeast, there is no need to activate the yeast. You just mix it in with your dry ingredients. If you have active dry yeast, it helps to activate the yeast first with some lukewarm water and leave it to ‘wake up’ for about 10 minutes. Do not forget to subtract the amount of water you use for the yeast from the total amount used in the recipe, otherwise the balance of the ingredients will be disturbed of course and your dough will become too wet.

      Good luck with it and happy baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  33. Kayla says:

    Thank you for this great recipe. I do not know how measure things in grams, so I was wondering if you had a recipe with a cups/tablespoons conversions. I attempted these croissants after converting to grams with the help of an online converter, but my dough was much to sticky and my croissants did not turn out as beautiful as those shown above (though the taste delicious).
    Thanks!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Kayla,
      It can also be the case that the flour you use has a different absorption than ours, because each flour type/brand can behave different and you always have to give it some tries to adapt to your ingredients and conditions. Maybe you have read in the introduction that our recipe is an adaptation of this one by Hamelman: http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/classic-croissants.aspx and we converted to metric from this recipe. So you can stick to that recipe, or you can take the ingredients list from that recipe and follow our instructions. Both will give good results, but croissants are one of the most challenging bakes and every baker faces challenges to get it right. But luckily they are still delicious even though they are not yet perfect!

      Hope you will give it another try.

      Happy Baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  34. khaled says:

    Comment faire de la couleur glacis croissant le doré et brillant et beau ce propres œufs, du lait, du beurre ou de sel

  35. Pingback: When at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again | thecookingchook

  36. Pung says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,

    Your croissants made me crazy, I really like it so much. Could I have ask you for a few questions?
    - I proofed my croissants in room temp with 25c and the result was my croissants not rise properly, the shape was flat. Could you give me some advice for this cause?
    - For the temperature of baking croissants, the perfect temperature should be 200c for 15mins or 170c for 40mins. Which temperature is the best for baking croissant

    Thank you so much for the best croissant recipe.
    Thank you again.
    Pung

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Pung,

      To answer your first question: it is difficult to judge without seeing the dough but you could take a look at both the flour you use (it should be a lighter type flour with around 11% protein content, some flours can be too heavy for croissant baking) and also the yeast you use ( verify it is fresh and not past the sell by date so it works properly). The room temp is excellent.
      As for your second question in the beginning you should really stick to the temperatures and times given in the recipe above (We bake the croissants in our big convection oven for 6 minutes at 195ºC, then lowering the temperature to 165ºC, and bake them for another 9 minutes.) and take that as a starting point to change things a little bit with further attempts. So around 200C for 15 minutes and maybe lower the oven when browning goes too quickly.

      Good luck with it and happy baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  37. Almost Burnt says:

    Hi, I was wondering, does the dimension of the square (of dough, and of the butter) change when you reduce the size of the recipe? For example, if you had a recipe for 30, and you had the dough dimension of of 26cm x 26cm and the butter 15cm x 15cm, if you were to cut that yield in half, how should you account for the dough square dimensions and the butter square dimensions please?

    Thank you,

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi there,
      For this you would need the square root: a slab of 26 x 26 = 676 cm2. With half the dough you can only make a slab of 338 cm2. To know the lengths of the sides of the square you need to take the square root of 338 which gives you a slab of dough of about 18 x 18 cm (18.38 to be exact). You can do the same ‘exercise’ with the butter.
      The challenge now is that you have a smaller slab so you will get smaller triangles and smaller croissants, because all the measurements are related. To get the full size croissants you have to stick to this recipe.
      Another suggestion would be to make the whole batch and cut it in half and keep the other half in the freezer for a later bake.

      Good luck with it and happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  38. Ray says:

    Hello,

    Thank you for the beautiful site and video on croissant making. A baker once told me that it’s a good idea to mix in a couple ounces of flour to the butter before laminating in order to make the butter “stronger”. Do you know anything about this technique/theory? Thanks!

    Regards from California

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Ray,

      Yes, we have read about this technique too but never tried it ourselves. It also seems to make the butter more pliable because it acts like a binding agent in the butter. Let us know if and when you give this technique a try?

      Happy baking and greetings from Holland,

      Ed & Marieke

      • shakil says:

        Hey guys
        Brilliant Croissants,keep up the excellent work.
        My 1st question,if you were to double the recipe ,will the butter an dough measurments be the sameas per the standard recipe?.an if not,will I have to make bigger croissant,?
        Do you guys make croissant on very hot humid days?,if so,can you set your airconditioner temp to around 22 degrees?,if faced with such a problem.
        Really am inspired by these beautiful ‘bad boys’ you have produced.
        Regard
        Shakil

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          Hello Shakil,
          First of all thanks! As for your question: The easiest option would be to work with two parallel batches and keep all the measurements as provided in the recipe. For a different method, let us calculate a bit and get back to you on that one. We try not to bake croissants on hot days, we know a baker who does and he tries all kinds of stuff to keep it cool, like storing flour and tools in the fridge. Usually we do not have air conditioners around here, they are not standard. But if you have one, of course it could work fine, it would indeed help to make the air colder and dryer. But for proofing you you then would need a spot that is a little warmer (25-26 C) and not too dry of course.

          Greetings from Holland,

          Ed & Marieke

  39. suganya says:

    wow wow wow… day of baking today. croissants warm from the oven, tasting so good cant stop eating… thank you so much for the wonderful recipe, i wanted to try this so long .. finally today.. good explanation , nice pics,, results r very good… dint expect such lovely croissants with so many layers.. thank u once again …

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Very happy to hear it work out so brilliantly for you too Suganya!

      Wishing you many more flaky croissants with impressive layers,

      Ed & Marieke

  40. Mike S says:

    There may be a flaw in your recipe. You call for cold water and milk, but the makers of instant yeast recommend all liquids be at 80F (27C) or warmer. My experience with no-knead bread suggests that water below 60F kills some of the yeast, and below 50F kills most of the yeast. This may be the reason some people’s croissants don’t rise well.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Mike,
      Thank you for your comment Mike,
      In our opinion this is not really correct. The yeast is not killed at these temperatures, but it simply goes into hibernation. People store sourdough cultures in freezers and and professional bakeries use fridges to let bread proof overnight. The activity slows down and even stops at some point, but when the yeast warm up it gets active again. Otherwise we would have encountered the same problems. The problem most people have is they work not fast enough (yet) and the butter gets too soft in between layers. It is being absorbed within the dough and this will result in more of a brioche shaped croissant than a flaky croissant. So, in our opinion warmth usually is more of a challenge to get the perfect croissant than cold.

      But nest time we bake we will measure the exact temperature of our ingredients and the temperature of the dough after kneading and update our recipe with this information.

      Happy baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  41. Amy says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,
    I am so happy finding your blog. It’s unbelievable… I finished the first step and … got the first questions :)
    Could you please enlighten me about ” leave in the fridge overnight”? I don’t know exactly how much time and the temperature inside the fridge. I left the dough in my fridge at 8′C but it rose fast after 4 hours. Meanwhile as I see in your video, when you remove the dough from the fridge, it looks unchanged in the dimension.

    Thank you in advance. Hope you have a nice weekend !

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Amy,
      Glad to be of help. Overnight usually means about 12 hours. Fridge temperature usually is 7 degrees at the most, ours is between 5 and 6 degrees Celsius. But do not worry, the dough should rise. It is hard to judge because you cannot see it very well but our dough definitely is higher after fridge time (not so much wider in dimension), I think between 1.5 and 2 times as high as when it went in.

      Hope this helps you.

      Happy croissant making and baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  42. Ronnie says:

    Hello I tried your recipe this week and I had a very hard time rolling the dough plus my butter was coming out, I tried putting back in the refrigerator for 30 min still it was hard to roll. My dough seems tough what could have i done wrong? how should the dough feel and look like after mixing?

    Thank you.

    Ronnie

  43. Leah Pikimani says:

    Thank you so much for your website help me to make croissant on my own. I would like to learn more if you can help me. I have done
    my NVQ level 2 Catering & Hospitality at City College&South Birmingham . I would like to hear from you as soon as possible.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Your welcome, glad you liked it. But do we understand you are looking for an internship or something? Because we do not offer that…

  44. Pingback: Kiireettömän päivän croissantit | TS Ruoka

  45. Alan says:

    Hi,

    I just recently found your website. Thank you for sharing your baking experiences. I have two questions concerning your croissant formula:
    1) the hydration is 56% leading to a rather stiff dough. Was this by default, or did you decide to forego the typical ~65% hydration range for some reason after experimenting?

    2) the percentage of Instant Yeast seems extraordinarily high. How did you decide on this, and it would seem to me that the rise and/or proofing from the amount of yeast would be extreme.

    thank you,
    alan

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Alan,
      As you can see the formula is a recalculation (to metric) from the recipe by the wonderful mister Hamelman. Except for a few adjustments and slight changes in the method we followed his excellent lead which works very well for us and the ingredients we use. The amount of yeast is not so high, considering the method used plus the fact that this is an enriched dough. When looking at hydration you should also take into account the amount of moisture in the added butter.
      Hope you give this recipe a try too. We get very positive feedback from many home bakers :)

      Happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

      • Alan says:

        I will. I’ve tried the formula from Steve B’s Bread Cetera (68% hydration from water and milk) a few times and have had problems with butter leakage regardless of how gentle I treat the dough. I also live in Florida where it is not so easy to keep a kitchen lower than ~78F (~25C). The feel of the dough is great but it is too hard to do the final roll out in prep for the shaping – and the bench warms the dough up too fast.

        I can get the appropriate rise and proofing from non-enriched doughs (and I’ve worked with baguettes, ciabattas and levains a few hundred times – I was a baker for a while), but working with enriched dough where butter is incorporated is a new game for me. I will indeed try your formula next.

        Just as with you, I accept that failure will be a constant when working on new formulas. It is the learning from each event that help get me to the next better trial, and error ;-) The only thing that is important is the final outcome after a number of attempts. Nobody gets it right the first time…

        Thank you for your rapid reply,
        alan

        PS I too love the beauty of the honeycomb interior.

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          Thanks Alan,
          You are so right. And if necessary, just allow for extra or extra longer fridge time to relax the dough and to get it colder before you continue to roll. Some bakers even put things like flour and tools in the fridge when the weather is hot.

          Good luck with it!

          Ed & Marieke

          • dana says:

            I made the experience, that the roomtemperature is one of tbe most important points while making the laminating. Everything changes the colder it is…but it should be minimum 21/20 degree celcihs. Had a try at 25 degree…it was a disaster. Also what I found out after several batches is that the utter should have the same consistency as the dough. Otherwise you get breakage. For example is the dough soft so should be the butter…dont wait till it gets to hard. Also the dough should not be kneeded too much…more like mixed. Because otherwise you will get too much glutenstructure a d the dough gets stiff. After mixing the ingridientses, lea e it in the fridge…you ll see the next day iy will be perfect and easy to work with, allthough it did not loom like that the day you put it in the fridge the first time. Then you do a lot of stretch and fold while laminating and if the dough was overkneeded while making it at day one it will be really stiff and hard to work with.

  46. Kevin says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,

    Im Kevin from Indonesia. First, sorry if my english bad :(
    i want ask.
    what happen if im change ( water + cold whole milk) into only cold water or only cold milk?
    can convectional oven make a flaky croissant?
    ive gone to singapore, and there’s a bakery there named ” Tiong bahru bakery by Gontran Cherrier”
    Its croissants is so flaky and have so super obvious layer outside
    i have done several trials, like baking at higher temp ( about 240c )
    or add about 50g milk powder for every 1kg of flour.

    and 1 more question,
    you do the croissant in 3 day
    i have tried it too, but im failed
    the dough rise in the fridge although im already wrap it with clingfilm tightly.
    so that the final croissant after i bake it, really small :(
    help me.
    Thank you,

    Kevin

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Kevin,
      Thank you for your comment. We would suggest if you want to use only water or milk to choose the milk because there are some things like proteins and fats and sugars in it that aid the baking. Your other question about the oven is really hard to answer because it depends on the oven. But yes it is possible. 240 C is really high for croissants unless the real temperature of your oven is in fact lower than the thermostat is indicating. Also see our tips on the use of your oven: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/bread-baking-tips-making-the-most-of-your-oven/.
      And the dough does rise in the fridge, that is normal and you should not try and wrap it too tightly to try and hold it down.
      And it is really important that the croissants get enough proofing time at the right temperature before they go into the oven.
      Also make sure your yeast is working properly.
      Just carefully follow our steps and stick to the recipe and do not try to change things unless there is no other way.

      Good luck with it and happy baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  47. muhammad ismail says:

    good

  48. Ivanna says:

    Hello everyone,
    I tried to do croisssnts several times and found the laminating to be a painful job. So I came up with my way of doing it. Insted of shaping the butter and folding it into the dough try to mix it with a little flour and live it at room temperature, put the gough to the fridge, after 30 min rest, take it out and roll out, put on a layer of butter mixture, fold, rotate 90 d and live it in the fridge for 30 min to rest, repeat the process untill you used all the butter mixture. For me it turned out to be a great way to make the most delicious croissants.

  49. huiwen says:

    do you mean 500g for dough 55g for dusting??

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Huiwen,
      No, the ‘type 55′ is the name or type indication of the French flour we use for this recipe, not the amount of grams. The extra flour for dusting is not indicated in grams. You just have to take a minimal amount of flour for dusting, needed to handle the dough. So you just give a dusting of flour, and brush of the excess. You should not see any flour and especially no white spots of flour on the dough once you start to fold it again. So in short, try to keep this flour for dusting to a workable minimum.

      Happy baking,

      Ed & Marieke

      • huiwen says:

        Oh, I see thank you very much!^^

        • huiwen says:

          Hi, Ed & Marieke! I’m so excited to do the croissants and to make cronut! And I very thank you for the recipe and the step. I just want to ask you in the process of laminate can I fold the dough over 3 times? And also the butter (for laminate) can change to pastry margarine or not? ?that will affected the texture?
          P/s my English is bad , sorry!

          • Weekend Bakers says:

            Hello Huiwen,
            Yes, that is no problem. As for the margarine, we do not have any experience using it so we do not know what the effect will be. We think it will definitely effect the taste but are not sure what it will do to the texture.

            Only one way to find out!

            Let us know how it goes?

            Marieke

  50. Nicole thorogood says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke

    I have been making your croissant recipe four times. All very successfuly. Beautifully crisp sweet buttery flavour pretty perfect. My last bake looked perfect too exept they did not have the sweet buttery taste.I wonder what could be the cause. I made the recipe the same way. The only thing the butter was not so hard. The lamination was good the butter did not leak out or escape. I can not beleave the softer butter could affect just the flavour and nothing else.
    I hope you can help.
    Thank you so much for your croissant log. Best recipe ever for croissant.
    Regards.Nicole.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Nicole,
      We do not think you butter was too soft otherwise the bake would not be this good. There is a slight chance that the butter may have ‘oxidized’ slightly or it also could have picked up odors from other food while stored. The oxidation happens when butter comes into contact with air and light, it turns a darker yellow and the taste alters. The picking up of odors can also happen in the fridge when butter is stored with other products. Both happen when butter is not properly wrapped / sealed. Oxidation can also be seen when butter is not that fresh anymore.
      Otherwise we would not have any other explanation. The only suggestion we can give is to give it another go (with fresh butter batch) and check the result.

      Good luck with it,

      Marieke & Ed

  51. Matt says:

    Hi guys! First of all, thank you for a wonderful and detailed receipe. I only have one serious problem after I am done with Day 2. Dough is increasing in volume threefold after is put in a refrigarator with constant temperature of 6 degrees Celsius. So on Day 3, I start with ball of dough literally. I am also very careful with temperatures during the whole process as advised in your receipe. I am using dry yeast also. What could be wrong? Please advise.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Matt,

      We think there is nothing really wrong except that your yeast is a bit too happy maybe. You could cut down on the yeast a bit, but it should not be a problem that the dough has increased this much as long as you very carefully degas it.

      Hope this helps you.

      Happy Baking,

      Ed

      • dana says:

        Hi,

        I had the same problem…after several batches i think I finally improved the problem. The dough was always rising too much…so the next day I had something like a blown up ball…and it blew the layers and quite destroyed them. Now instead of using a kitchen scale for the yeast i use a spoon scale, they measure much more accurate to 0,1g. I also forgot many times to dissolve the yeast with the sugar and salt in the liquid, that has changed too. The salt acts on the yeast!
        Also I tried to make them in two days. First day – making the dough. Second day – laminating and then i form and bake them. They turn out perfectly. I could not tell the difference between a croissant made three days and that which was made in two days, neither in taste, nor look. So you get rid of the laminated dough blowing up like a ball breaking all the layers. Greetings.

  52. linda says:

    Hi….I just made this croissant recipe yesterday for the very first time and im so happy and surprise that my croissant turns out perfectly exactly like your picture. I used king arthur bread flour instead of all purpose flour. It just I think its a little too salty for my taste other than that its delicious. Perhaps next time I just use less salt. Thank you so much for your tutorial step by step. It is a really yummy croissant. I’m planning to make pain au chocolat and pain au raisins 2 more weeks. Can I use this recipe and method too? Are they the same? Do you have the special recipe for pain au raisin?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Thank you Linda, for liking it so much!
      Yes, you can use the dough for making pain au chocolat and pain au raisins no problem. Also Danish with creme patissiere are very nice (see picture from us in our croissant log file: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/wkb-2012-croissant-making-log/).

      We do not have a recipe for pain au raisin. But you roll the dough into a log and cut it lengthwise into slices. Most add frangipane or creme pat. Raisins are sometimes soaked in cognac. you also see versions made with brioche dough. There are recipes to be found on the web but we cannot recommend one from our own experience at the moment unfortunately.

      Happy croissant baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  53. Hello and greetings from Romania! I have just discovered your website and I am amazed by the quantity and quality of informations you have here. I see it comes from a lot of work and experimenting so thank you for sharing. Since visiting France I have been wishing to replicate the croissants I had there so finding your website is such a lucky thing. I will start on making the croissants today so I am pretty excited. Also saw your video with croissants making and it’s brilliant. Love to see the path from pure ingredients coming to life into perfectly croissants. So cheers and keep you posted with the results.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Thank you Ana-Maria and love to hear about your results.

      Greetings from Holland &
      Happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

      PS: The pictures on your website are beautiful and everything looks delicious and inviting!

  54. tonnie mande says:

    i like this website i learned about the bread procedure,

  55. Duy Thanh says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke

    Thank you for your repice and very useful tips. ^^.But i have a question, did you wait the dough double inside then put in to the fridge or put in fridge when you kneaed ?..i’ve seen many vids and some people wait the dough double inside then put in to fridge, i’m still confusing about this can u explain…thanks you very much :)

  56. Jens says:

    Dear both, thank you for this great recipe… I have tried it once so far, and the croissants were nice, but far from perfect.

    I am working on the second try right now, and I have a question: after laminating the dough and putting it into the fridge, I have noticed that the dough is proofing quite a bit. The last time it did not proof that much, but this time it seems to grow a lot. Is there anything I can do? Did I do something wrong?

    Thank you for your help…
    Jens

    • Jens says:

      Never mind… Just saw some of the other comments and questions posted. Should have read them before more carefully :)

      • Weekend Bakers says:

        Hello Jens,
        We do have one other remark on the subject. As you get more familiar with the recipe you also will work faster and more efficient and the dough will be in the fridge sooner, allowing less time out of the fridge to already proof, so this way it will also get a bit less hopefully.

        Happy croissant baking!

        Ed & Marieke

  57. Darci Davidson says:

    Hi,

    I am going to be making them tonight. How many does the recipe make?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Darci,

      If you stick to the measurements of the recipe you will get 15 or 16 good croissants plus there will be some left over pieces of dough that you cut away but you can also use and bake.

      Happy baking!

      Marieke

  58. sarah says:

    I made this recipe for my first time ever making croissants and it worked perfectly. Light, fluffy and soft on the inside and crispy and flaky on the outside. I will definitely be making them again. Thank you so much

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Great to have such a fantastic result the first time you made the recipe. Sounds exactly like they should be.

      Happy baking & eating!

      Ed & Marieke

  59. I have been trying many recipes and this one is absolutely the best ever. On my first attempt the came out fantastic. Thank you guys. How can I post a picture of mine?

  60. Pingback: Classic French Croissant - dietandgossip

  61. tonnie mande says:

    i like this website and easy and nice presentation..

  62. Lori says:

    Can anyone please answer this guestion.When I take my croissants out of the oven they look amazing then within minutes they go flat!!!what am i doing wrong? Lori

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      We have two suggestions: bake them a bit longer, maybe they are not yet completely stable inside. The other thing is to turn of the oven after baking but leave them in the oven for a few minutes with the oven door ajar so they can cool slowly.

      Hope this helps,

      Marieke & Ed

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  64. mehdi says:

    Hi
    I have a question for Day1,some people say its better stir sugar and milk and yeast and after this step mix another ingredients ,do you agree on this way?
    thanks

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Mehdi,
      We never do this and we do not think it is necessary. Within minutes the other ingredients follow so we do not see the point of doing this first. The yeast will have more than time enough to develop in this recipe, so there is no need for these extra steps.

      Happy croissant baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  65. Dorothy says:

    Dear Ed and Marieki,

    Just discover your website, I’m very excited to see wonderful recipe, planning to follow it by heart.
    Looking forward for more sweet indulgence. Well done and thank you.

    Dorothy

  66. behnam says:

    Hi
    Iv baked croissant lastnight ,the taste of croissants were good but they had not puffed,they were flated
    does somebody have idea for this problem?
    Thanks

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      The first thing to look at is the flour itself. We use French type 55 flour with a protein content of around 11%. This works really well. Maybe your flour is a bit too ‘heavy’, resulting in a flatter croissant. So maybe try the recipe with a different flour.

      Good luck with it!

      Marieke & Ed

  67. shyam b. baniya says:

    I like very much

  68. Nicole says:

    Hello Ed and Marieke

    I have been making your recipe for croissant very well about six times.Pretty perfect with strong bread flour( English 13.2protein)I wanted to get a even more perfect croissant ( i am french living in the uk so i wanted a even more french testing one)so I decided to get on line French type 55 flour. The result was not so good.
    The dough was very soft I wondered if it was to much water. may be type 55 flour need less water.
    The result was a croissant a bit flatter a bit softer. It also needed much more time to cook. The first tray was a bit underdone.
    If it was my first attempt,I will have been very happy with them. May be they were a bit more like a French croissant but not perfect. I was expecting to get a better result with the right flour.What can I do to perfect it or should I stick to my English flour.

    Could you also help me with a little problem i get when I laminate the dough I can see the butter separated at the joints.
    (I am very careful when shaping the butter)
    I thank you in advance for your help and your other amazing recipes. Wonderful website
    Nicole
    PS. You are right when you said. Croissant making is not easy. Sometime they are a 9/10 other 8/10for no reason. Still pretty good. Never a flop so I am happy.
    Previously I was using Michel Roux recipe. Very respected but I had to give up after poor result until I found your wonderful website.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Nicole,
      We also think the use of the type 55 flour might need some adjusting in the shape of a bit less water. We do have the best result with this flour, but then there probably are differences too between type 55 flours from different sources. We would suggest giving it another try with adjusted moisture, but otherwise, if the other flour works perfect, stick with that!.

      Can you explain a bit more what you mean exactly with ‘butter separated at the joints?’

      Thanks for liking this recipe and our website, we really appreciate it!

      Happy baking!

      Ed & Marieke

      • Nicole says:

        Hello
        When I start laminating I can see the butter under the first layer of the dough, and is is not in one piece maybe it is a bit hard and is separating at the seems. ( of the block of butter cut to form a rectangle )
        I get a bit nervous to have my butter to soft.
        I hope you can understand what I mean.
        Thanks for your help.

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          Hi Nicole,
          The obvious thing to try is just to be brave and work with butter that is just a little bit softer. Ed really pounds on the butter and that way it gets supple pretty fast. We do have to say that our butter is of a consistency that is already a bit pliable from the fridge. There might be a difference with different brands of butter, or things maybe added to butter that make it different. In the end there’s no substitute for experience, so….your first few attempts will probably be less than perfect and so it was with us too. So it could be that you go from too hard to a bit too soft..but next time you will know from experience exactly how it should look and feel.

          Good luck with it and happy croissant baking and eating!

          Marieke & Ed

  69. Frances says:

    I’m planning on making these for Christmas morning, so my question is will they be okay proving overnight in the fridge so we can just get up and bake them on the day? Also, I may be being a little blind here, but I can’t tell how many this will make!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Frances,
      Yes you can do that, if you are a bit of an experienced (croissant) baker, because you need to judge when the proofing is perfect to get a good croissant. They might need some more proofing time after a night in the fridge, also depending on your fridge temp. So give them the time they need and only bring them to the oven when ready and wiggling!

      With this recipe and the measurements given you get 15 good croissants plus some leftover / cut away pieces of dough which you can also roll and fill with some chocolate for example. They will not look that impressive but will still taste very good, so it would be a shame not to use them!

      Hope they turn out great.

      Happy baking and a wonderful Christmas time!

      Ed & Marieke

  70. Philip says:

    Started making the croissant dough on monday, baked them this morning expecting them to be a flop and they turned out awesome, thanks so much for the recipe, Not quite 100 percent but for a first try a huge success, thanks again :)

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Great Philip,
      Thanks for sharing and many more wonderful croissants for you in 2014!

      Greetings,

      Ed & Marieke

  71. Sara says:

    Hello there! Thank you for this fantastically detailed recipe. I am on Day 1 of 3 and am currently psyching myself up for the laminating process tomorrow.

    I have a question for you that I’m hoping you can help with. How long does the dough actually have to sit in the fridge when you say “overnight”? Is the suggestion that it will sit from one morning through to the next morning, or that you would make the dough the night before and roll it out the next morning? Or does it matter? Just wondering as I made the dough early this afternoon and wondered if I could laminate it at midnight, about 10 hours later.

    Thank you,
    Sara

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Sarah,
      Overnight in this case can be stretched a bit from anywhere between 12 and 20 hours (based on our own baking with good result). We also think that your plan with about 10 hours in between should work out fine.
      Most important thing is you give the croissants enough time to proof after shaping, at the right temperature (like it says in the recipe).

      Good luck with it and hopefully there will be fresh croissants to be enjoyed soon!

      Marieke & Ed

      • Sara says:

        Wow – thank you for your prompt reply! You’re like a crisis line for croissant makers.

        I just rolled out my first laminating layer and ran into a problem – my butter, although it appeared to be one solid layer, split along the original “seams”, and is distributed unevenly throughout the dough. Is it possible to have the butter TOO cold? I thought that would be the last of my problems based on all recipes I’ve read, but it seemed to me that the butter was too cold to roll out smoothly. I’m assuming that when you put the butter layer into the dough, it is supposed to be “right out of the fridge” cold, but I don’t know how it could be rolled out at that temperature.

        Thanks!
        Sara

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          That is not always the case…we have to say, but glad to be of help when online…
          Take a look at our croissant video: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/video-making-baking-classic-french-croissants/
          Yes the butter comes out of the fridge but you have to pound on the butter first and then it becomes the right consistency /thickness to role out later.
          If your butter is a bit too hard and cold from the fridge, just wait a little bit and it will soon be a bit warmer and easier to roll. It should always be ‘pliable’ enough so it will not break.

          Good luck again!

          Marieke

          • Sara says:

            Thanks so much! My croissants turned out beautifully! Thank you again for these great instructions, and the video was very helpful to get a feel for the speed and method of rolling the dough. Very helpful!

            Sara :)

          • Weekend Bakers says:

            Great news Sarah! Keep up the wonderful baking!

  72. Mia says:

    Hi,

    Thank you for this amazing recipe! I baked croissants for the first time and (amazingly) they turned out looking and tasting like croissants thanks to your recipe. I will be aiming for a more open crumb next time, as I think I allowed the butter to get too warm at one point and started to enter brioche territory.

    I do have one question though – my croissants smelled a little of yeast in the very centre. Is this a sign that they were undercooked? Or overproofed?

    Thanks,
    Mia

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Mia,
      We are not really sure. The thing is, due to the long fermentation of the dough, it naturally smells slightly of yeast, but we cannot judge of course if your croissants had that same smell or maybe a little bit more.
      Based on what you are saying we would suggest you bake them a few minutes more next time and compare the results.

      Good luck with it,

      Ed & Marieke

  73. LD says:

    Hi from Southern California,
    I saw your wonderful blog on your Classic Croissant. It is gorgeous. I tried the recipe to the T. It turned out really good just like in your picture. The only problem I had was rolling out the dough. I cannot roll it out up to 60 cm it is about 10 to 15 short no matter what. I rested the the dough did all what you recommended. What do you think was the problem? The honey comb texture is there, the taste is so so good even on room temp, it does not flake off when you bite. Overall it was a success I must say. I made two batches and the other batch I will make Croissant Au Chocolate today.
    Thank you so much.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi LD,
      Thanks for your kind words. Sounds like you did everything more than OK. The only thing we can think of is the limit of the extensibility of your dough, ’caused’ by the flour you use. It is not really a problem of course, the croissants having turned out perfectly, but you could try and play around with a few different types / brands of flour and see how that turns out. We get the best croissants with our French Type 55 flour with around 11% protein. We also used Manitoba flour and dough made with this flour is very elastic and extensible but for us the results for croissants were slightly less. But any sack / batch of flour can act different, it is just a matter of testing and baking (and eating!).

      Good luck with it!

      Ed & Marieke

  74. essam says:

    Nice foto

  75. tiago says:

    Hello,
    Thanks for the recipe and detailed steps.
    Can you tell me if the overnight rest before the final shaping is needed?
    Would I still get a good result if instead of the overnight rest I just leave
    them on the fridge or freezer a couple of hours?

    Thank you!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Tiago,
      The recipe works the way it is described and if you change things the result might be different of course. It is always hard to judge what will or would be the difference with the original version if you have not tried that before. We would always recommend making the recipe as is the first time. But if you cannot wait or are pressed for time you can try it the way you suggest. The only thing is that with this timing you would probably have fresh croissants in the middle of the night so you might want to take a look at when to start the whole process and when you are aiming for having the croissants ready.

      Good luck with it!

      Ed & Marieke

  76. Izabela says:

    Hello, i am in the process of making the croissants (day 2). While laminating the dough during second rolling out I noticed that the butter was separating into pieces in the dough. What can be the problem? Butter was too cold? I used it straight form the fridge. Or maybe the butter wasn’t a good quality butter?

    Thank you

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi there,
      We think it could be a combination of first of all not having pounded /slapped the butter into one solid piece enough and also indeed the fact that it could be a bit too cold straight from your fridge. The quality of butter can differ too of course but it would be very hard for us to judge without seeing it. Our butter has a fat content of 82% and we always use a fresh packet.

      Good luck with it!

      Ed & Marieke

      • Izabela says:

        Thank you for a fast answer. I think it’s possible the butter didn’t become one piece. I will find out tomorrow how the croissants are. If not good I will keep trying. I looked through a lot of recipes and yours seemed to be the easiest and the best. Beautiful photos and great instructions

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          Thanks Izabela!

          • Izabela says:

            Despite butter issue the croissants came out great. Crunchy and flaky on outside and soft and chewy on the inside. The inside was a bit too moist which I think had to do with butter separating and not being even. I did achieve nice layers though. They tasted great! My son and husband ate them up like there was no tomorrow.

            I will keep making them until I get them as good as on your pictures.

            Thank you.

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  79. Elaine says:

    I just made this recipe, it was amazing. I love a good croissant recipe. but I think i’m having an issue with the butter, but maybe not as there were perfect layers and you could see them. Anyway, when I start to laminate the dough i see the butter break into smaller pieces within the dough, it looks almost marble-like, if that makes sense. Am i rolling the dough and butter while it’s too cold? Do i let the butter be a little soft so it doesn’t break? I made sure the butter and dough are the same firmness, but it always seems like the butter is hard and the dough is softer even when i just take the dough out of the refrigerator.
    Again, you can see the layers in the croissants i made but while rolling them I didn’t know if it was going to turn out or not, and 3 days of waiting would have been a big bummer. Thanks!

    • Elaine says:

      oh well, i just saw the above comment. oops

      • Weekend Bakers says:

        Yes, it seems more people have this same challenge with their butter. We cannot really say without comparing it live but it could be that some butter might be more brittle than other. But it is a good idea to let it get a little warmer and more pliable.

        Good luck with it!

        Marieke & Ed

  80. Izabela says:

    Hello again,

    I made the croissants for the second time. Baked them this morning. First time I had problem with butter separating inside the dough. This time I purchased better butter with 82 % fat content, 250g one piece. I did not cut the butter to form a square, I just simply pounded and rolled it the way it was in one piece, then trimmed etc. this time the butter didn’t separate and the dough came our beautiful! And my croissants were simply perfect! I knew your recipe was bulletproof, I just needed to keep trying.

    Oh, did I mention I live in France? I have had croissants in many different bakeries and the homemade beat them all.

    Thanks again for your tips!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Wow Izabela, that sounds exactly like it should be..you must be one happy croissant baker :)
      Good to know that different butter did help.
      Hooray for homemade!

      Happy baking in France,

      Marieke & Ed

  81. Maureen van der Kroft says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,

    Firstly I want to say I love your blog and I have read all the comments and answers and have loved every minute.
    I am making the croissants for the first time and tomorrow I will be on day 3. My question is if I shape my croissants this evening and leave them in the fridge covered overnight and then prove them tomorrow morning for 2 hours………..will it make a big difference???????
    Looking forward to your answer
    Maureen

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Maureen,
      Have you tried this method already? It should be no problem to do it like this as long as you make sure they are perfectly proofed when they go to the oven.

      Happy croissant baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  82. Blex says:

    Hi, thank you for the recipe!
    I’m experimentig croissants by 4 years. i’ve tried many many recipes and made my personal modification to find the final recipe. In the last experiment i’ve tried your recipe as i ever really wanted that marvelous honeycomb i dreamed for years and never reached. In the last few experiments i’ve started using Margarine for lamination instead of the butter because in hot weather it is more usable compared to the butter as margarine have an high melting-point temperature.

    The problems:
    Also this time, your honeycomb hasn’t came out… no way… but i had a great improvement in flakiness and in internal empty space (i finally have a big empty spiral inside the croissant). The main problem of my experiment has been the rising. Simply the croissants hadn’t rised during proofing… neither of 1mm. just not rised.
    I don’t know why. For the experience gained in previous experiments i think fats in the dough inhibit yeast activation because in all experiment i added melted butter in the dough, then the dough had problem in rising during proof (yes, for sure it maybe that the culprit is the instant yeast of my country).
    The croissants rised a bit in the oven where each free external layer expanded gained flakiness, but after 20 minutes of oven they were brown and flaky externally but half-uncooked internally (i could see white dough layers)
    What might have happened?
    Also, i noticed my oven reached 190°C before putting in the croissants, but once in, the oven can’t sustain 190°C and remained to 155°C for 8-9 minutes before rising again to 190°C (i have a portable oven-thermometer). Activating the internal oven fan haven’t sorted out any effect. (PS. do you suggest the activation of the fan in the oven?)

    The question:
    In my country, instant yeast is sold in little bags containing 8 grams of light-brown grains (some brand 10g). On the bag they write this quantity is the best for 500g of flour and that it is pair to 25g of fresh yeast.
    In your recipe i see 11g of yeast. Do you suggest me to use the advised quantity of yeast printed on my bags (8g) or to use just 11g as for your recipe also if my yeast come from a different country/brand ?
    (I don’t think this could be the problem of my last experiment as the lacking of 3g of yeast couldn’t explaing the no-at-all rising).

    Thanks again.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Blex,
      Your problems are quite a challenge..for us too we must say. First of all we never use margarine and cannot really advise you there based on experience. Your oven is a challenge all by itself and the temperature drop may account for a big part of your problem. We would advice using the fan oven especially in the beginning to generate more heat.
      You need to stick to the quantities of yeast we give, because on your package they give you advice for an average loaf of bread but croissant dough (enriched dough) is very different and as a rule needs more or even a different type of yeast.
      We also would suggest taking a look at the date on the package and making sure you use a fresh, not yet opened package with a far enough in the future ‘sell by’ date, next time you make croissants.

      Good luck with it,

      Marieke & Ed

      • Blex says:

        Thank you very much. Yesterday i’ve made another dough and used a yeast sold in bags of just 11g with indication of correspondance to 25g of fresh (hydrated) yeast. I think this is the most comparable to your.
        In some minute i will do the lamination and i will use pure fresh butter with 80%+ of fats.
        Keep finger crossed for me!

        Thanks again for your help!

  83. tobias says:

    thx so much for this recipe sir ! you are really very honest , i tried it ! this is my first time to make croissant and the result is very very good ! u can chek mine here ! i https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151883447457691&set=pcb.10151883447712691&type=1&theater

    thoby from indonesia

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Great to see Tobias, thank you for sharing your results and wonderful you are so happy. Very good first time!

      Greetings from Holland,

      Marieke & Ed

  84. Maureen says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,
    I did not wait for your reply and was to scared to spoil all my hard work so I got up at the crack of dawn on Sunday to roll out and prove my croissants. By 10am we were sitting down to coffee and croissants ……heaven.
    They were delicious, thank you for all your instructions and for sharing them with us.
    I would still like to know if I could roll them out the evening before and then prove and bake on the third day? Has anyone tried it?
    Once again thank you
    Maureen

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Maureen,

      Wonderful…good you tried it (very brave getting up so early!) like this and it worked out so well. And yes, you can do this the evening before, proof overnight in the fridge. We know people do this and get great results too (we usually do not have the fridge space). Just make sure the next day they are proofed to perfection before taking them to the oven.

      Happy baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  85. Margherita says:

    Hi guys:) firstly, thank you for sharing a wonderful recipe:) will try tomorrow for the first time. But I wanted to ask one thing. Since we are only two in the house, the consumption is not that big and the work is a lot. Is there according to you a way of storing the made dough? Meaning that for example I make the whole batch and then leave it in the fridge and bake croissants just from a half of the dough? Having them freshly baked from the rest the next day or the day after you know? I understand it’s better to make them all fresh but they would go waste nevertheless. Can’t eat more than 2 a day. Thank you very mch for your opinion on this.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      The best thing we can advise and what we do is bake them all and then store the left over ones in the freezer. When you want to eat one put them in the oven for around 7 minutes at 175C. If you want to keep the dough, don’t do it in the fridge, keep the slap of dough (not shaped croissants) also in the freezer, otherwise it will keep on developing. Maybe your method will work if you keep the shaped croissants in the fridge overnight, but there will be a limit before they deteriorate. We have not tried this ourselves because the first method works very well for us.

  86. Margherita says:

    Sorry, one more question. I’ve just rolled out the dough (first laminating rolling) and The problem is, that the butter was very hard from the fridge. In your video, it seems all soft and “rollable”. My butter was breaking inside the dough, at some points visibly. So it looks like it broke to big pieces and the dough rolled out around it ( more or less). I don’t know if it’s normal, or if it was my mistake and I should have left the butter at the room temperature for a bit before closing in in the dough?:( is it too bad? Or the next rollings will make it better? Thank you, I really want those nice croissants:)))

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Please check the answers to these same questions from other bakers right above your question!

      • Margherita says:

        I apologize for not reading through the forum, just did a quick search and obviously bothered you with something already discussed. I’ve tried to do a better job when looking for this other trouble I encountered. I don’t know why, but the dough in the fridge rises so much! From the first disk I made, it doubled in size overnight. Then after laminating, it became a giant over the other rest in the fridge. It even opened the well sealed cling foil I wrapped it in. Don’t know if it’s the fridge temperature or the yeast I’m using. Should I leave it resting for a shorter time or it just doesn’t matter and I should work with it as normal? Thank you for helping me with this last one:)

  87. Tracey Kinney says:

    I was hoping to get the ingredient measuserments from before you converted it to the metric system so I could try this recipe.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Tracey,
      You can find what you are looking for by clicking on the Jeffrey Hamelman link in the introduction of the recipe.

      Good luck with it.

  88. Farhan alfin says:

    Dear sirs,

    I would like to ask you about the long shelf life Croissant Recipe.

    best regards

  89. Hashemi says:

    Hi everyone,
    First of all I wanted to thank you for your very informative and complete walkthrough explanations.
    I am a semi industrial producer of croissant with high quantity daily production.

    My problem is that we are using bread flour to produce our croissants and as you know bread flours are strong and not intended to be used in layered dough products, and therefore as the result our products are a bit heavy and dense, but the taste & freshness is very good.

    I wonder if you could kindly help me with how to use baking enzymes in order to enlighten the flour and get a better result in weight and internal structure.
    I have heard that some enzymes like Xylanase, Gluco Oxidase & even Transglutaminse are very helpful for industrial producers.

    Many thanks in advance.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Hashemi,
      We are sorry but as we are all artisan micro and home bakers meeting here, we are all about baking with (the right) flour, water and salt (and butter for croissants) and would not want to or need to use any enhancers like enzymes to aid our baking.
      So this is not really our area of expertise.

      Good luck with your baking,

      Ed & Marieke

  90. Abino says:

    Tried these ,never made them before they were out of this world.

  91. Hashemi says:

    Dear Ed & Marieke,
    When you’re saying that we need to put the dough in the fridge for example after each rolling & folding, or for a whole day after the third time fold, what should the temperature of the fridge be? Around 4-5 degrees Centigrade or something way below like -18?

    Thank you

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Hashemi,
      The fridge temperature should be around 5 degrees Centigrade, that would be ideal. Minus 18 is the temperature of your freezer and is (for us) a good place to store leftover croissants and bread to keep it as fresh as possible.

      Greetings,

      Marieke

      • Hashemi says:

        Do you keep the croissant dough or the baked croissants in freezer, and how long can we keep them freezed?
        How should we unfreeze, proof and bake them when we bring them out of the freezer?

        Regards

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          We keep the baked croissants in the freezer, get them out straight into the at 175C preheated oven for 8 minutes, then they are perfect for us.

          Good luck with it!

          Marieke

  92. maysa says:

    at the moment i do not have an oven but my grill is working can i still make these …

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Maysa,
      We would definitely not recommend this. For baking, and especially something so challenging as croissants, you really need an oven. Maybe a friend can help out so you can bake them there.

      Good luck with it,

      Marieke

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  94. Madleen says:

    Hi
    Im making this batch of croissants for my family who’s coming to visit… I already done the dough and the layers and was going tp shape the croissants and freeze them unbaked. And get them out on sunday morning and put then straight in oven . would that be ok? Won’t it compromise the taste and flakiness?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Madleen,
      May we ask when you are planning on doing the proofing of the croissants? Because this can take quite some time. We would suggest taking them out on time to first get them up to the right temperature (around 25 C) and then proof them until ready for the oven. Putting them in the freezer already proofed might ‘proof’ to be more of a challenge on the result.
      So…get up early to make sure your croissants are ready for the oven in time.
      Our preferred method that works really well for us is to freeze the croissants already baked. Take them straight from the freezer to the preheated oven and warm for around 8 minutes at 175C.

      Best of luck with it.

      Marieke & Ed

  95. pankaj says:

    croisant is very nice

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  97. Leslie says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke,
    Wonderful site! This information is so helpful. When I make croissants at home they never quite have the perfect honeycomb structure that make croissants so wonderful. The crumb isn’t quite open enough, and also at times has rings of “wet” or “undercooked” dough. The dough usually does fight back a bit during lamination, which I’ve never thought before to be from the over mixing in step one, and possibly also leading to damaged layers. Any other thoughts?
    Is there any other indicators other than time to tell when you have reached a moderate gluten development? I’ll be mixing by hand, so any tangible difference you’ve noticed would be very helpful.
    thanks so much!
    -leslie

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Other than the windowpane test (moderate means dough should still be (partly) opaque and not see through) and experience we would not know. To be honest we do not do this test, it is more that you develop an eye for how the dough should look and feel and also how it ‘behaves’ in the bowl…

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  99. Ann King says:

    I have read your recipe and your responses to your classic French croissant recipe and while I am impressed with your enthusiasm regarding your method and find your product to be beautiful, I don’t feel that it is necessary to make classic French croissants over a three day period. I am a French trained pastry chef and of all of the recipes that I have used and shared with other French trained pastry chefs have found that generally two days is all that is required to make a perfect French croissant. I simply make my laminated dough with 3 single turns the day before I want to bake the croissants. This gives the dough plenty of time to rest before rolling, cutting, and proofing, which can be done the morning of baking. I never roll my dough any less than 1.2 cm thick, and if your refrigerator cannot maintain a consistent temperature below 4 degree C, then you should rest it in the freezer, or the dough will begin to proof in the refrigerator during the resting period, decreasing the quality of your finished product and potentially causing your croissants to taste sour. Hope this helps. p.s. If you have left over croissants there are many recipes available on the web that will show you how to turn these into tasty breakfast treats to be eaten the following morning.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Thank you so much for your additions and advice Ann. Much appreciated. We also tried two day versions but for us this three day Hamelman method gives the best result. The first ‘day’ is of course just 10 minutes work in the evening, so we do think this three stage method works very well for the home baker who can easily incorporate it in a busy schedule. You are right about the fridge, it could cause unwanted proof if it is not cold enough of course. We can understand that that there will be many bakers who would prefer the two day method for several reasons.

      Thank you again and happy baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  100. hi there,

    Found these instructions really useful for making croissants, pain aux raisins and pain au chocolat! I was just wondering how you would go about bulking up the recipe, ie. if I wanted to make twice the dough would I have to make the lamination size 120 x 40cm each time for the folds? (rather than 60×20?).

    I’m currently making 3 times this quantity weekly and will probably increase again!

    Andy

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Andy,

      Thank you for that!
      Doubling the size means 60 x 40 cm (so you could end up with two pieces of 60 x 20) With your size it would be 4 x as big.

      Good luck with the increased croissant production :)

      Marieke

  101. Dr swapna sonar says:

    I made croissant as per your recipe.they were awesome.my husband and my kids really enjoyed. Perfect honeycomb appearance.i made with homemade white butter.in Mumbai ,india temperature was the only problem,but solved by making in air conditioned room.thank you so much.,for teaching recipe in steps as well as very methodically.

  102. Edna Kaveza says:

    Hi weekend bakery,
    Your croissant look delicious I tried it out but it was not good as yours.i think I didn’t do the mixing well.
    Kindly give me the measurement of ingredients in other way apart from grams because I don’t have the the things to measure in grams maybe ml and table spoons will give me more highlight

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Edna,
      They are:

      For the dough

      1 lb. 2 oz. (4 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour; more for rolling
      5 oz. (1/2cup plus 2 Tbs.) cold water
      5 oz. (1/2 cup plus 2 Tbs.) cold whole milk
      2 oz. (1/4 cup plus 2 Tbs.) granulated sugar
      1-1/2 oz. (3 Tbs.) soft unsalted butter
      1 Tbs. plus scant 1/2 tsp. instant yeast
      2-1/4 tsp. table salt

      For the butter layer

      10 oz. (1-1/4 cups) cold unsalted butter

      For the egg wash

      1 large egg

      But we have to point out that results will be better (and all the good bakers agree) if you measure your ingredients. Baking is regarded an ‘exact science’ .

      Good luck with the recipe and happy baking,

      Marieke & Ed

      • Edna Kaveza says:

        Ooh you can’t believe it I did it again.This time I conquered it was very tasty.Atleast my son didn’t laugh at me
        Thanks weekend bakery.

  103. hassan says:

    hi there
    i did croissant but i got dry from outside if u eat like you eat cookies and also inside not that much light still have like dough
    so do you have any advise to avoid that
    thanks
    hassan

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Hassan,
      It seems your croissants are not properly cooked / baked. The first thing to do is to look at your oven (accuracy / temperature) and the baking time. You can find handy tips to help you here: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/bread-baking-tips-making-the-most-of-your-oven/

      It is very normal that you need to adjust to get the perfect croissants. Also you need to make the recipe several times to develop the right speed and technique to make them better and better.

      Good luck with it,

      Ed & Marieke

  104. Andrea says:

    Well I’ve really enjoyed your website, especially your croissant instruction, so much so, that I’ve decided to give it another go (having previously tried other recipes and websites, not so successfully). Unfortunately the weather has decided to get just that little bit warmer, so have been a bit challenged in the butter department. Anyway, they are currently on their last 2 hour proof, having been rolled into their little croissant shape, so will let you know how they turn out, otherwise they’ll have to be binned (unless you have any suggestions on what I could do with them) and will have to try again on a slightly colder day. My kitchen temp at the moment is 60 degrees! but outside is 74 degrees so I’m sure you can appreciate how difficult it’s been. But I’m getting ahead of myself, fingers crossed. I have a question though, on your video you say to put the dough in the freezer for 20 minutes before laminating but your recipe says 30 minutes, is there a great difference? Many thanks and will let you know the results later.

    • Andrea says:

      Ok, so they weren’t great. They looked the part before they went in, but once in the oven I noticed that there was butter melting everywhere. I had to cook them a little bit longer, because they weren’t cooked inside. Any thoughts? I did notice when I was rolling out the dough that the butter seems to have broken up a bit, so maybe I rolled to hard in the initial lamination? If you have any ideas I would greatly appreciate it, just to help point me in the right direction next time. Thanks in advance.

      • Weekend Bakers says:

        Hi again,
        If you look at the comments just a little bit above yours you can read up on the butter challenge and what maybe can be done about it.
        It is possible that several tiny things need to be tweaked to get the recipe right for your oven, ingredients, environment et cetera. By baking a lot (esp. with croissants) and getting to know the recipe really well so you can also get a good work tempo, your results will improve.
        Check out some more tips in our croissant making log: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/wkb-2012-croissant-making-log/

        Good luck and happy baking!

        Ed & Marieke

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Andrea,
      It depends a bit on the temperature of the freezer, so both could be right or somewhere in between. Experience will learn what works best for you.

  105. elena says:

    hello! thanks for sharing your receipe with the others :) i recently discovered your site and i’m very very excited about your infos, videos, tips. I made my very first croissants after your receipe and this is what i got:
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/t31.0-8/1268809_530985283689790_1828252224_o.jpg
    https://scontent-a-fra.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t31.0-8/10012206_530985343689784_1080649197_o.jpg

    i want to add that i don’t posses a modern oven, i’m using a gas oven and despite of this fact i’m quite happy about my results.
    thanks again for sharing.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Elena,
      You should be because they look really great! Almost cannot believe this was a first attempt. Very impressed.

      Happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  106. Jasmine says:

    Wow! Love the detailed step by step instructions! I’m on day 2 of the Croissant making adventure! I do have a question though.
    How hard and fast are the rules regarding the measurements of the rolled out dough? I rolled my dough out to 20×60 the first time but the second time I started rolling it came out to closer to 30×60. Is this a problem and if so, can it be salvaged or am doomed to have no croissants tomm! :(
    xx Hopeful Croissant eater

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Jasmine,
      Too late to tell you that it really helps to stick to the measurements, because then the whole thing works perfectly…but all is not lost :) :
      In this case, just fold the 60 cm side letter style, you end up with a piece of 30 x 20 and then roll it out again to 60 x 20 and take it from there. So hopefully no doom but tasty croissants!

      Good luck with it,

      Ed & Marieke

      • Jasmine says:

        Thanks for the reply Ed & Marieke. I ended up working with the measurements I had and got 11 Croissants instead of 15, which was OK.

        A few things obviously went wrong:
        1. My slab of butter had broken up into islands of butter during the laminating process – is there a specific trick to ensuring it stays whole? Perhaps a slab of butter that is a little bit warmer than right out of the fridge? This way it might be easier to roll out without breaking up?
        2. The croissants did not proof well. They did not rise much during the two hr proofing process. I left them inside my oven, which is the warmest place in my apartment. I pre heated the oven at 170 Fahrenheit, about 30 mins prior to putting the croissants in there for proofing, so the oven was still a little warm.
        3. As a result of the proofing…or lack thereof, they didn’t rise much during baking either. So they were not all puffy and gorgeous…they were good, but not as light. I could def see all the layers when I bit into it, and it was delicious…but I know it would have been even more light and fluffy had the dough proofed well.
        4. The croissants tasted too salty to me, i used the measurements you provided in your recipe (converted them to tsp, tbsp and cups). I wonder if that was a result of the islands of butter when laminating?

        All in all, they were good. We’re eating them the next day as well, with some Nutella spread! Yum!

        I’ll def be giving these another try, coz i just cannot accept that I didn’t achieve perfect croissants! :)

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          Hi Jasmine,
          -A few comments above this you can read about peopel who have the same butter issues and the answer we (and they) have given. If your butter just needs to be a bit warmer to get pliable we suggest next time you just get it out 10 minutes or so in advance and take it from there. It should not break up when you pound on it, it should def. stay in one piece.
          _You seem to be doing everything right so we would suggest looking at the quality and quantity of the yeast here, maybe your current yeast is not active enough for some reason.
          - The yeast has to work hard because of all the butter in this dough. If possible you can try a different brand or maybe fresh yeast and see if this helps.
          -Converted I would take 2 teaspoons of salt, but based on personal preference (the butter needs to be unsalted of course) you can take it down a bit, no problem.

          It sounds like you are still enjoying this batch and rightly so because you got very good results with a first attempt with one of the hardest to master bakes. So thumbs up to you and hope you will give it another round soon.

          Happy croissant baking,

          Marieke & Ed

          • Jasmine says:

            Good suggestion on the yeast! I’ll try and different one next time.
            Thank you!

  107. Anne Ruslan says:

    Dear Weekend Bakery,
    Thank you a million for your French Croissant Recipe, I adore it so much! I feel so satisfied for every bites and really make my weekend’s breakfast so special with! I shared your croissant recipe and your website through my humble blog.

    Greeting from Perth and Wishing You a lovely day!
    Anne

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Thank you so much Anne, that sounds absolutely wonderful.

      Wishing you many more delicious croissants!

      Marieke & Ed

  108. Bock says:

    Dear Weekend Bakers,
    Hi good day, very impressed by your beehive croissant. Is it possible to let me know which type or brand of butter to use? Cause back home in Malaysia the temperature is quite hot and the butter tends to melt easily before I could cut and roll it.

    Hope to get some feedback from you

    Sew Yang

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello,
      We cannot give you a brand that would also be available in your country. All we can tell you is that we use fresh dairy butter that has 82% fat solids. Maybe the fridge and the freezer can help you with keeping everything (including tools) cool.

      Good luck with it and happy baking!

  109. Bee says:

    Dear Weekend Bakery,

    thank you very much for sharing your detailed tips and recipe. Hopefully I can try this soon. Just one question, I saw recently some pictures of pain au chocolate with very defined layers on the edges which I think looks very nice, such as this picture http://www.foodreporter.fr/dish/index/id/75640#. To achieve this, do you think it’s a matter of adjusting the number of turns (fewer layers)? or maybe not wrapping too tight when shaping? thank you very much.

    Bee

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Bee,
      Frankly we have no idea, because to us the pastry looks a bit strange (almost a type of filo) and the layers look ‘shifted’ and compact somehow, so to us it looks like it was wrapped very tight already. It also almost looks deep-fried. There is mentioning of using banana in the recipe but not sure what kind of role that would play in the dough.

      Just experiment maybe with a small batch and see what comes out.

      Happy baking!

  110. Eva says:

    Hello from Greece
    In which stage can freeze them and then bake them?
    Need to thaw and then to bake?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Eva,
      We would suggest freezing them after shaping then taking them out on time to first get them up to the right temperature (around 25 C) and then proof them till they are perfect and ready for the oven. Putting them in the freezer already proofed might ‘proof’ to be more of a challenge on the result.
      Our own preferred method that works really well is to freeze the croissants already baked. Take them straight from the freezer to the preheated oven and warm for around 8 minutes at 175C.

      Best of luck with it.

  111. Christina says:

    Hi there!

    I just completed the second attempt at your croissant recipe with the only difference being the use of RapidRise Highly Active Yeast in the first attempt and Dry Active Rise yeast in the second (I did activate the yeast myself). The second attempt with the active rise yeast did yield doughier croissants. I did notice that the dough rose quite quickly in the refrigerator. Do you think this could have been my yeast being a bit too ‘happy’ and the refrigerator temperature not being cold enough, therefore causing accidental proofing? How much should my dough rise? Also, could you tell me what brand yeast you used? Is instant yeast the same as RapidRise highly active yeast or breadmachine yeast?

    So far they have not been complete failures. I am continually working to improve my skills so I can yield that same flaky layers as you have shown to have been possible in making!

    Thank you!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Christina,
      Both could be the case. If you use these other types of yeast you should adjust a bit. Usually you use a bit more of active dry than instant yeast (see below), but the types you mention we do not know and have no experience with. We almost always use instant yeast (sometimes fresh), the type that needs no activating and can be added directly to the flour. Yours seems a special version that is extra active or maybe mend for enriched doughs, which can be perfect, but you need to find the right amount to use. Maybe there’s some info on the package to help you. A bit of rise in the fridge is normal, and with a few tweaks we are sure you are going to find the optimum for your conditions and ingredients.

      Converting from fresh yeast to active dry yeast you multiply the weight of the fresh yeast by 0.4
      Converting from fresh yeast to instant dry yeast you multiply the weight of the fresh yeast by 0.33

      Happy baking!

      Marieke & Ed

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  113. Angharad Norris says:

    Hiya! I’ve used a James Martin recipe that’s on the BBC website for my first time baking croissants and it had 20g of dried yeast in. Annoying I had to use half the amount of butter specified (250g instead of 500g). I left it to rest overnight and formed my croissants around lunchtime. I was slightly worried because the dough smelled quite strongly of fermented alcohol (which I hoped would go once baked!). However, once baked the inside of the croissants still smelt like this. It was quite unpleasant though not as unpleasant to taste. I’m going to try the recipe on this website next time but I’m just wondering if this bake would have been improved by using the right amount of butter or if this would have made little difference? I’ve probably been a right muppet haha! Thanks! :)

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Angharad,
      That does sound a bit worrying. We would always recommend to not use or eat something that has such a strong and off putting smell. It is rather unusual having this smell working with instant yeast, but something got in your dough and caused the production of alcohol.
      Of course the recipe uses this amount of butter for good reason, using only half will make a big difference in texture and taste.

      Good luck with it!

  114. sue-chan says:

    Wow – great instructions, pictures and video. You’ve inspired me. I’ll let you know how it goes.

  115. cookandbaker says:

    Hey Ed and Marieke, hope all’s well with you. Thanks for this amazing recipe and the detailed guidelines. The photos are great and so is the video. I’ve just popped mine in the oven to bake and shall be posting on my blog my recipe if they turn out well as I’ve departed from yours by using my own sourdough starter in my dough. Quick question: you refer to the ‘first’ thin coating of egg so I was wondering, is there a second one at some point. Sorry if I missed it but don’t seem to find that in your account.

    All the best, and happy baking!

    Andrew

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Andrew,
      You are very right, we already corrected it. The second layer of egg wash is applied right before baking. Thank you for noticing and hope your croissants will be great.

      Happy croissant baking,

      Marieke & Ed

      • cookandbaker says:

        Hey, thanks for letting me know! My sourdough croissants went very well! I am beside myself as a previous attempt (albeit with a different starter) wasn’t at all successful. This one worked great and the sourness and buttery taste was a great combo. Do have a look at the photos and my recipe on my blog for ‘sourdough croissant recipe’ when you have a minute!

        Thanks! Andrew

        • Weekend Bakers says:

          Wonderful and delighted this sourdough version turned out so well for you. We will take a look of course!

          • cookandbaker says:

            Hey,
            was wondering whether you had any thoughts on freezing spare unbaked croissants. You say 8 minutes straight from the freezer for baked ones but was wondering whether unbaked ones can be baked straight from the freezer or whether they need to thaw first.
            I’d be very grateful for your insights! Andrew

          • Weekend Bakers says:

            First of all we never do this ourselves, so our advise is not based on our own actual baking experience but if we did this ourselves we would thaw first and get it up to a perfect proofed stage and then bake them.

            Hope you will let us know how it works out for you.

            Happy croissant baking!

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  117. Chang says:

    Hey! I’ve used this recipe a few times with success and I want to try something new. I want to put chocolate chips onto the triangles before rolling them into form so the chocolate melts into the croissants while baking. Any tips on doing this? What will I have to change if anything? Thanks!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Chang,
      This is very well possible. It is very simple to do, just place the chocolate at the beginning and roll up. You only need a very small amount of chocolate (normally they use a small chocolate stick, so make sure your pieces of chocolate resemble that a bit to get even distribution) around 4 grams would already be enough. So, you do not need to change anything.

      Good luck with it and happy croissant baking and eating!

  118. kosta says:

    hi i’m wondering if u can give me the nutritional value chart for ur recipe pless email me back kostarobertson@gmail.com

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      We do not have this information for you Kosta, other than that the butter used has a fat content of 82%. There are probably apps for this, but we have never looked into it I’m afraid.

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  120. Jackie Tearle says:

    Hi, thanks for your recipe, I’m keen to give it a try but a few questions:
    I’ve never measured liquid in grams – am I weighing the milk and water??
    With regards to kneading the dough; I don’t have an electric mixer so knead by hand-for bread I knead for about 15 mins so the dough is elastic and not sticky. What point should I stop for this recipe
    Thank you :-)

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Jackie,
      Yes, you also weigh the water and milk, this is the most accurate way to do it. Kneading by hand, it depends a bit on your kneading of course, but we would suggest kneading for around 7 minutes. You are aiming for low to medium gluten development, it does not need to reach the stage you normally aim for, you want to avoid it becoming too elastic.

      Good luck with it and happy baking!

  121. zulkifli says:

    I need help with the rolling. Whenever i try to flatten the dough, only the dough layers stretches thin while the butter layer stays the same thickness. Once the difference in thickness reaches a certain point, the butter “penetrates” the dough layer; there will be like patches were the dough layer just tear apart. Another problem is that the rolling doesnt “press” the butter layer, it just pushes it around. Any tip is greatly appreciated.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello, the best thing to try is another brand of butter. Different brands have different hardness, water content etc. We use an organic soft butter. Even from the fridge it is not a solid brick but is a bit pliable. Success!

  122. Stenly says:

    Dear Weekend Bakery,

    i have some questions for you.
    First, when 1st mixing of the dough. Do i need to mix it until i could do a window development test ? ( fully developed)
    What happen for the final results of the croissants if i mix the dough untill full developed ?

    Also when laminating the dough, i find that when i rest the dough at chiller ( 6 degree C ) for 30 mins, the dough was proofing, and the butter become hard. ( So when i rolled the dough for the 2nd single turn, the butter broke inside the dough, resulting the surface of the dough become wrinkled) . What should i do ?

    Thank you,

    Stenly

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Stenly, You only need to mix to moderate gluten development. All the laminating with the rolling and stretching will develop the dough even more. We have found out that the dough will be very hard to laminate by hand in the later stages when you fully develop the dough, it will fight back alot…

  123. Kevin says:

    Hey Guys,

    Thank you for this great recipe! I made some delicious croissants last weekend and will make more this weekend, starting with the dough tonight :) Here is how mine turned out http://imgur.com/a/2PeAJ

    I would like to improve my next batch, and aim for that perfect honeycomb texture :) One thing I would like to improve is in the consistency of the layers. On the very last rollout I could see islands of butter, through the layers. How can one reduce such a a thing? I did notice airpockets during the first and second rollout – I suspect this is the cause..

    What is the best way to remove those airpockets at the butter stage?

    Also you were right about the baking being dependent on the oven. I have a gas-oven and ~15 mins on 200C did not cut it, I found it was close to 30 mins for me :)

    Another thing, my wife makes this delicious chestnut paste from scratch and I’m planning to use that as a filling. I made a small one last week and it was delicious :) So I’m making bigger ones this week! Do you have any tips/suggestions on the size of the pastry for fillings? specifically how big were the rectangles for your pain au chocolats?

    Cheers!

    Kevin.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      First of all, your croissants look amazing already, something to be proud of!
      A lot has been said about butter islands in the comments above, it seems that more people have these issues and we think it can have several causes:
      We think it could be a combination of first of all not having pounded /slapped the butter into one solid piece enough and also the fact that the butter could be a bit too cold straight from your fridge. The quality of butter can differ too of course but it would be very hard for us to judge this without seeing it. Our butter has a fat content of 82% and we always use a fresh packet. The butter has to be pliable and not too cold, not too warm. It is a question of experience, but also maybe trying another brand could help.

      As for the filled pastry and measurements: with pain au chocolat we usually use leftover bits from the croissant dough.
      A good size for them would be 10 x 10 cm / 4 x 4 inches. Maybe the paste also works very well when making pinwheels or pain au raisins. You can find the info and how to divide the slap of dough for this here: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/pinwheels-pain-aux-raisins/

      Happy croissant and pastry baking!

      Marieke & Ed

  124. Yan says:

    Salutations from Africa!
    This will be my first time attempting to make croissants. I’ve been researching for the past week now and judging by the pictures and reviews, I’ve decided that this recipe is THE ONE.
    I have one question and that would be if:

    I can substitute AP flour with Bread flour and still get a decent result?

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello, when you use bread flour please make sure it is not strong bread flour. The stronger the flour, the more gluten, the more gluten the harder it is to roll out the dough. We have tried at least 4 different flours before we found our winning flour which will stretch easy without tearing up the dough structure. Happy baking.

  125. Aneesa says:

    Hi there. .. I baked a batch if croissants, they took long to bake. They actually didn’t brown at all and I left them longer. When I took them out of the oven. They were hard and not crispy at all..The texture inside the croissant is like bread dough. .plz tell me what went wrong. . I didn’t bake all the rolled croissants. I still have a few left over unbaked. Plz plz help

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Aneesa,
      Trying to judge without seeing your description would indicate that there is something going on with your oven.
      (also check out our tips on this subject: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/bread-baking-tips-making-the-most-of-your-oven/) The first tip is: How accurate does it indicate the temperature? First of all it is wise to find out what the real temperature of your oven is compared to the temperature indicated on the settings.
      It could very well be that your oven setting needs to be higher. Baking longer at an actual lower temperature can possibly be blamed for the not crispy result. The bread dough result can also be caused by damaging the layers. You need more practice to get it right, which is perfectly normal with something so challenging as making croissants. Check our log for some very good tips: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/wkb-2012-croissant-making-log/

      Happy baking!

  126. Megan says:

    Hello,
    I made your recipe over the 3 days as suggested and put the dough in the refrigerator for 30 minutes after each time I rolled it out. They ended up too dense as you can see in the pictures I have put links too. Do you have any suggestions why this has occurred? They are flaky on the top, taste yummy but are not the right texture!
    Thanks a lot,
    Megan
    http://megansoric.wordpress.com/?attachment_id=311

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Megan,

      Yes we do! It looks like all your butter got absorbed by the dough. This happens when you are probably working a bit too slow and the temperature of your surroundings is too high. We suggest keeping the dough in the fridge for a little bit longer (60 minutes) or try again on a cooler day. Also using a different brand of butter or type of flour will help. You really need a ‘light’ flour for this. Croissants are ‘choosy’ some types of flour (or brands of flour) simply do not give a good croissant. The only way to find out is the try, and try and try again. You can see in our croissant log that you are not alone, we went through a lot of the same experiences: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/wkb-2012-croissant-making-log/
      It is really not possible to make a perfect croissant the first time you try. It is a very challenging bake to master.

      Good luck and happy baking!

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  128. Aubrey says:

    Hi Ed and Marieke,

    This recipe looks to be one of the best I can find and I absolutely cannot wait to try it out starting tomorrow. However, I do have a few questions. How long can croissant dough be left in the refrigerator both prior to and after laminating? I was also wondering if it is possible to refrigerate or even freeze the croissants after they have been formed and proved.

    Thank You

    Aubrey

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Aubrey,
      We want to advise to if possible stick to the times given in the recipe, especially if you have never made this recipe before. The periods before and after laminating can be stretched by a few hours (it also depends on your fridge temperature).

      We cannot advice you on the second question because we never freeze or cool croissants before baking (we only freeze after baking). We can only tell you that this has been done by some bakers, but we don’t know the effect on the quality of the bake. Keep in mind that it can effect the layers and baking times might also have to be adjusted.
      We would suggest, for a first bake, to go through the whole process without the extra freezing or fridge time and make notes if and when at any time you depart from the recipe. Remember croissants are one of the most challenging bakes and it is very normal to need several practice rounds to get to grips with the process and get a perfect result.

      Happy croissant baking,

      Marieke & Ed

  129. Cathy Stone says:

    I’ve tried 3 different times and got 3 different results. my biggest problem is they come out rock hard and more like brioche. They taste delicious but are too hard to eat and not layered !?!? How many things am I doing wrong? also I live in Hawaii so my kitchen is always about 78 degrees. I don’t have air-conditioning. Thank you.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello Cathy,
      It is very likely all your butter got absorbed by the dough. This happens when you are probably working a bit too slow and the temperature of your surroundings is too high. We suggest keeping the dough in the fridge for a little bit longer (60 minutes) . Also using a different brand of butter or type of flour will help. You really need a ‘light’ flour for this. Croissants are ‘choosy’ some types of flour (or brands of flour) simply do not give a good croissant. The only way to find out is the try, and try and try again. You can see in our croissant log that you are not alone, we went through a lot of the same experiences: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/wkb-2012-croissant-making-log/
      Croissants are a very challenging bake to master so the only way to reach perfection is practice and practice some more…

      Good luck and happy baking!

  130. Fortino Guzman says:

    I like crossants

  131. Wynn says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke, Thank you for the wonderful tips and instruction. The croissant fresh out of oven is like a dream comes true, crispy outer layer and cloud-like on the inside. I am in Singapore where it is hot all year round so I have to make these in a 21 celcius airconed room ( wrap in myself in blanket while the dough chill out in the fridge) but it was so worth it. I did not wash the croissant with egg though as I feel the egg might cause layers to stick and hinder oven spring, so I switch to milk, the rest I follow the recipe religously.
    Thank you again for your dedication to help us follow bakers re-create this magnificent pastry in our humble home kitchen.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Wynn,
      Sounds like you mastered the recipe perfectly, which is quite a challenge under your conditions! So keeping the room chilled and yourself warm is the way to go :). You are right about the egg wash, if and when you use it you should brush it on top but be careful not to coat the layers on the side, so they can expand freely.

      Hope you will bake many more beautiful and delicious croissants. Maybe give the other pastries a try too with the same dough: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/pinwheels-pain-aux-raisins/

      Happy baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  132. Laura says:

    Thank you so much for your detailed croissant making instructions! I am a first time croissant-maker and if I had not stumbled upon your blog, I would probably not have even attempted to make these. The first batch just came out of the oven and they are beautifully crisp and flaky on the outside and soft on the inside. I did not achieve the perfect honeycomb structure that I would have liked, probably because my butter got too warm while I was laminating, but I am so excited to make these later this winter when it is cooler and hopefully get a better structure. Either way they are delicious! Thank you!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Thank you for sharing your excellent results with us Laura, and wishing you the perfect honeycomb when winter baking!

      Greetings from Holland,

      Marieke & Ed

  133. Tamara says:

    Thank you for this recipe, it is the most accurate I have seen online and I have tried my first croissants yesterday! They were delicious, I just have to work better on keeping the butter cold!
    I am looking forward to trying other recipes from your blog!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Tamara,
      Thanks for your feedback! As you make them more often and work quicker, your butter also has less chance of getting warmer. In the meantime using the fridge a bit more or longer is a good idea.

      Happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  134. Marla says:

    I love to make croissants and tried this recipe. The flavor is excellent, they rolled out great. However, when I cooked the first pan in our conventional oven at 430 f, and the centers did not cook through and the outsides were brown and yummy. I cooked the second pan at 400 f and the center was a little more cooked but not like the outside. Not alot of butter leaked out like with some other recipes. My pan were almost dry after cooking. Any suggestions to get the centers to cook? Thank you sharing your wonderful recipe.

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Marla,

      Our suggestion would be, if you have a fan / hot air setting, to try and use that. It could also be that the real temperature of your oven is not exactly the same as indicated by the thermostat so it could be that you need to start at 450 ten lowering the settings during the second half of the baking process. Try to keep the heat in the oven, especially at the beginning of the process. Some people open the oven door to take a quick peek several times, but you will loose a lot of heat that way. Please also note that the inside (cooked but with a certain softness) of a good croissant is different from the flaky outside. The fact that there’s no butter leakage is also a very good sign.
      Maybe some of our oven tips are also helpful for you: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/bread-baking-tips-making-the-most-of-your-oven/

      Good luck with it and happy baking!

  135. Yang says:

    ABSOLUTELY AMAZED! If there is a rating for your recipe/instruction, I’d give it 5 out of 5! I’ve tried other recipes – instructions – adaptations and have been left wanting. You’ve provided insights and tips that nailed it. At first, I was skeptical because I thought too much reading and who’s got 3-days to make and bake croissants; it’s quicker to just go get it ready made and enjoy. But I do enjoy baking from time to time for the simple pleasure of it so decided to give it a try. It really tastes just like the store bought croissants (if not better) with only 2 differences: this is FRESH and contains no preservatives! This is definitely a keeper. Thank you for making this recipe available!

  136. Cathy says:

    After my first failure at croissants, I took your excellent advice re: temperature, type of flour and different butter. This batch I just made is 75% better!! Thank you so much….You really know you’re baking!!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Thank you for the excellent feedback Cathy, really happy to hear this!

      Lots of loaves (and great croissants),

      Marieke

  137. Vanesha says:

    Dear Ed and Marieke ,

    I think your recipe is amazing and I would really love to try it soon!
    I’d like to know whether its okay to actually prepare the dough (before laminating) on Sunday afternoon/night and then use it(laminate it) not on Monday but on Tuesday morning instead? Will that affect the whole process of making the croissant?
    And is it really crucial for the dough to rest one night before shaping it and bake it?

    Thankyou so much Ed and Marieke for sharing this recipe..

    Sincerely yours, Vanesha

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hi Vanesha,
      The answer is yes, it will make a difference. The problem is, when you make a recipe for the first time, you will probably not be able to judge if your dough is doing alright or not compared to the way it is usually made. So we would always advice you to make the first batch to our specifications and stick to the times given and work from there. If you stretch times your dough can start to over-develop, also depending on fridge temp. For the last stage it is not crucial to wait until the next day, but you do need to give the dough a few hours to relax so you can work it better. The reason we made this an overnight thing has to do with when you want to eat fresh croissants, (you want to eat your croissants in the morning and not later in the day or the evening for example).

      Hope you can work out your own schedule that will still give great result!

      Greetings from Holland,

      Ed & Marieke

  138. Matt says:

    Hi guys,

    Thanks so much for your post. I’m a Huge fan of the french croissant and see them as the holy grail of all pastry!
    I’m on my second go round following your recipe and am already a legend! – having had a pretty good result on the first. But exploring different flour and butter (Australian this time) and trying to get the proofing right.
    So many variables… but you guys have narrowed them to a manageable equation for the home baker.

    great job..

    Cheers

    Matt

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Thank you for the wonderful feedback Matt and it sounds like with each bake you are going to improve and really make this recipe your own!

      Happy croissant baking!

      Ed & Marieke

  139. H.Shahid says:

    Hi,

    I’ve tried making croissants a few weeks ago, using a different recipe and guided notes, but wasn’t aware that he butter had to stay cold throughout the whole process. The butter did start to melt, but I did get great results never the less.

    All of my family Love croissants, myself included, and I’ve always wanted to make them. After the first attempt, I was so surprised, that I was curious to see what they’d be like if demo correctly. I shall be making the croissants tomorrow for out family trip to the zoo, and I am planning to make the croissants the today, allowing them to “Proof” over night and baking the next day. However is this possible, or will I see butter puddles in the morning?

    I’ll see what happens leaving them for a few hours, and then put them into the fridge over night. I’m trying to make it easier ans shorter for me tomorrow as we will be out really early.

    I’ll post after I’ve made and tasted them too!

    Thanks a lot!

    H.Shahid

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello H. Shahid,
      Sounds like you had a good plan with leaving them to get up to speed and then use the fridge for the remaining period and bake early in the morning. As long as the temperature is right there will be no butter leakage. Hope it all worked out for you!

      Greetings,

      Marieke & Ed

  140. M Morales says:

    Hello,
    I tried this recipe for the first time this past week. The results were amazing and delicious. The pictures and the video are so helpful and thorough. Watch the video if you’re a newbie! I had the video playing while I was laminating and dividing the dough. If I use this same recipe to make pain au chocolat, what measurements do you recommend for cutting the dough and how do you shape the dough?

    Thank you for having such a great website!

    • Weekend Bakers says:

      Hello,
      We can just picture you busy laminating while watching the video. Excellent!
      For the pain au chocolat we would recommend dividing the dough into 10 x 10 cm squares, add small pieces of chocolate at the beginning and roll up (not much more than 3 to 4 g of chocolate is needed). If you choose to make only pain au chocolat you can divide the 100 x 20 (40 x 8 inch) slab in 20 pieces of 10 x 10 cm (4 x 4 inch), thus ending up with 20 pains.
      We can also recommend making pinwheels and pain au raisin with this dough. See: http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/pinwheels-pain-aux-raisins/

      Happy weekend baking!

      Marieke & Ed

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  143. Eva says:

    Hallo,
    Ik heb drie keer geprobeerd om de croissants te maken, maar ik loop telkens tegen het zelfde probleem aan.
    Alles gaat goed met het maken van de croissants en tijdens het bakken rijzen ze goed. Maar wanneer ik de oven open zakken de croissants helemaal plat in. Wat kan ik hier aan doen? Ze smaken verder heerlijk maar ik krijg ze maar niet goed gerezen
    Groetjes eva

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